Early publicity shot







Vince Guaraldi Timeline

Compiled and annotated by Derrick Bang






 

 

 

This document is a detailed companion to my published career study, Vince Guaraldi at the Piano. Even at close to 400 pages, the book wasn't long enough to permit the inclusion of every significant event, performance or recording date during Guaraldi's quite busy lifetime. Additionally, a project of this nature never really "concludes," because new information always comes to light; this document will serve as the perfect home for such fresh material.

Many of the entries found here concern club gigs, concerts, studio recording sessions and other live appearances. Additional listings include significant events such as album release dates, TV appearances, premiere dates for the TV shows and movies for which Guaraldi wrote music, and album chart successes. Personal milestones are shown in blue, should any site visitors wish to concentrate solely on those entries. To the best of my research ability, the data given is accurate with respect to date, place and individuals involved. If the details for any given event were hazy or uncertain, I didn't guess; you'll note that missing information is listed as "unspecified."

Nearly all the photos, handbills and other images are small versions of larger originals; merely click on the image to see the full-size version.

It's my strong hope, over time, that this information will be examined carefully by Guaraldi's friends, neighbors, colleagues and former sidemen (many of whom are not only with us to this day, but still performing!): folks perhaps in a position to help fill in some of the missing details. Any visitors with additional information -- names with which to replace the "unspecified" tags, or gigs that aren't even listed here -- are asked to contact me, so this timeline can be updated. (I'd also love to know the precise day when specific clubs closed; surely somebody Out There was at The Trident on its final night ... and wasn't too, ah, impaired to have marked the date on a calendar?!) The goal is for this document to expand with time, and remain the up-to-date account of record for Guaraldi's life and career.

If you have longer comments that can't be satisfied by these short timeline entries, please visit our Vince Guaraldi blog. We'd love to hear from you!

 

1928     1933     1935     1942     1946     1948     1949     1950     1951     1952     1953     1954    

1955     1956     1957     1958     1959     1960     1961     1962     1963     1964     1965     1966    

1967     1968     1969     1970     1971     1972     1973     1974     1975     1976     1977     1978    

1979     1980     1981     1982     1983     1985     1986     1988     1989     1991     1992     1994    

1996     1995     1997     1998     2000     2001     2003     2004     2005     2006     2007     2008    

2010     2009     2011     2012    

 

If you wish to jump to a specific year, use the table above and click on the year in question; otherwise, enjoy the journey as you scroll through Guaraldi's busy but lamentably brief life. (And don't be surprised by the fact that this chronology continues well after Guaraldi's death in 1976; his legacy continues to thrive well beyond his mortal self.)

 

 

1928

July 17

Vincent Anthony Dellaglio is born in San Francisco's North Beach area.

 

1933

Unspecified

Five-year-old Vince takes an interest in keeping the beat when his uncles, Joe and Maurice "Muzzy" Marcellino, visit the home and perform music for the family.

 

1935

Unspecified

Seven-year-old Vince's mother, Carmella, begins giving her son piano lessons.

 

1942

September

Vince, as a Boy Scout, receives merit badges for safety, personal health and firemanship.

 

Unspecified [While in high school]

Guaraldi takes formal lessons from jazz pianist, composer and bandleader Leonard Auletti.

Guaraldi meets and begins dating Shirley Moskowitz.

 

1946

Unspecified

Jack Rushin opens a nightclub at 609 Market Street, San Francisco. The neon sign ordered to hang above the entrance arrives flawed, but Rushin elects to use it anyway; Fack's eventually will become one of the city's jazz hot spots.

June

Guaraldi graduates from Abraham Lincoln High School, in the center of San Francisco's Sunset District.

July-August

Guaraldi gets his first commissioned gig, performing at a summer resort in Yosemite.

September

Guaraldi begins his two-year military hitch in Korea.

 

1948

Unspecified

George Andros takes over Fack's, and soon begins a more aggressive policy of booking jazz acts.

Summer

Guaraldi returns home from Korea.

Autumn

Guaraldi enrolls in a music course at San Francisco State University: the extent of his university career.

 

1949

Unspecified

Guaraldi has his first professional gig, briefly touring with saxman Kermit Scott, who formerly worked with Thelonious Monk.

Guido Caccienti and Johnny Noga purchase a building at 200 Hyde Street, which once housed San Francisco's Stork Club. They re-fashion the space into a nightclub, and call their new business the Blackhawk. Roughly a year later, local radio DJ Jimmy Lyons persuades Caccienti and Noga to book a rising jazz act: the Dave Brubeck Trio. From that point forward, the club becomes one of San Francisco's hottest jazz spots.

Jazz pianist Slim Gaillard opens Vout City, a nightclub at 1690 Post Street, San Francisco. Gaillard abandons the endeavor after only a few months; new manager John "Jimbo" Edwards remakes the place into Jimbo's Waffle Shop, and begins to host after-hours jazz sessions. Before long, the place becomes much more famous under a new name: Jimbo's Bop City.

 

1950

Unspecified

Eric "Big Daddy" Nord opens a club in the basement of the Sentinel Building, at the corner of Kearny and Columbus, in San Francisco's North Beach area. For reasons that are debated to this day, the club is given the name the hungry i.

Guaraldi meets and begins jamming with Cal Tjader.

[At this time, Tjader is most often a member of Dave Brubeck's Trio, alongside bassist Ron Crotty; sometimes Tjader also performs with Brubeck's Octet.]

 

1951

Unspecified

Eric Nord sells the hungry i to Enrico Banducci.

April 12-?

Cable Car Village, in San Francisco, as part of the Chuck Travis Quartet, with Travis, tenor sax, Charlie Price and Pat Krilitich.

Summer

Strip Town (later known as The Carousel), a San Francisco strip club, playing for the girls with Tom Hart, sax; and John Markham, drums.

[This gig runs about three months.]

Late August/early September

In the Fantasy Records studio, San Francisco, for two days, recording a never-released demo with Tom Hart, soprano sax; Eddie Duran, guitar; Gus Gustafson, drums; and an unknown bass player.

Tracks recorded: "Naivete," "Cacophony," "Minority" and "I Double Dare You." "Minority" is written by Guaraldi.

Autumn

Guaraldi joins Cal Tjader's trio, replacing John Marabuto (who had been with Tjader since May 1951).

November 13-?

The Mardi Gras, in Oakland, as part of Cal Tjader's Mambo Trio, with Jack Weeks, bass.

[This gig runs at least two weeks, possibly three or four.]

November

Fantasy Studios, as part of Cal Tjader's Mambo Trio, recording the four tracks released on Tjader's first Fantasy session as a bandleader, The Cal Tjader Trio.

Tracks recorded: "Chopsticks Mambo," "Vibra-Tharpe," "Three Little Words" and "Lullaby of the Leaves."

[These tracks, and four others, eventually are released in December 1953, as the album The Cal Tjader Trio.]

Late November/Early December

The Blackhawk, in San Francisco, as part of Cal Tjader's Mambo Trio, with Jack Weeks, bass.

[Ralph Pena subbed in for Weeks for at least one day, possibly more.]

[The band would remain at the Blackhawk well into 1952.]

 

1952

August

Fack's, in San Francisco, backing singer Helen Humes, with Cal Tjader, vibes; and Jack Weeks, bass.

Later summer/early autumn

Tjader's combo, with Guaraldi, -- and Jack Weeks, bass; and an unknown fourth player -- becomes the house band at Fack's.

September 18 (?) -- first week in October

Fack's, backing singer Mary Ann McCall, with Cal Tjader's Quartet.

[The September 26 show is broadcast live on San Francisco at Night, at 9:30 p.m. on KPIX-TV Channel 5.]

Early October -- October 25

Fack's, backing headliner Georgie Auld, tenor sax, with Cal Tjader's Quartet.

October 26-December 10

Fack's, with Cal Tjader's Quartet (as house band).

December 2-20

The Blackhawk, as intermission pianist, performing in between headliner Art Tatum's sets.

December 11-January 10

Fack's, backing headliner Georgie Auld, tenor sax, with Cal Tjader's Quartet: Jack Weeks, bass; and Nick Esposito, guitar.

 

1953

Through January 10

Fack's, backing headliner Georgie Auld, tenor sax, with Cal Tjader's Quartet: Jack Weeks, bass; and Nick Esposito, guitar.

[Tjader disbanded his unit immediately after this gig concluded, and joined George Shearing on January 16.]

February 1

Guaraldi and Shirley Moskowitz marry.

March

Saxman Charlie Mariano records a Guaraldi composition, "The Nymph," on his debut album for Fantasy Records, Charlie Mariano. Guaraldi does not perform on the album, but this marks his debut recorded sale. The album is released in November 1953.

Late March/early April-summer

Touring with the Bill Harris/Chubby Jackson Sextet (for roughly a year): Harris, trombone; Jackson, bass; Charlie Mariano, alto and baritone sax; Harry Johnson, tenor sax; Joe MacDonald, drums.

[One known gig took place April 15, at the Canyon Club, Ogden, Utah.]

[Leroy "Sam" Parkins, clarinet, joined the band in early summer, when it played in Wildwood, New Jersey.]

Unspecified

Performing with saxophonist Georgie Auld (off and on, possibly into early 1954).

October

Author and bullfighting aficionado Barnaby Conrad opens a nightclub at 492 Broadway, San Francisco; he calls it El Matador, after his 1952 novel.

 

1954

Unspecified

Enrico Banducci moves his hungry i club to its most famous location, at 599 Jackson Street, in the basement of the International Hotel.

Spring/summer (?) through the rest of the year

The hungry i, San Francisco, as house band, with Eddie Duran, guitar, and Dean Reilly, bass. This gig runs at least a year, possibly more. During much of this time, the trio backs singer Faith Winthrop.

 

1955

March 30

Guaraldi and the rest of his extended clan watch the annual Academy Awards ceremony, on television, as his Uncle Muzzy Marcellino performs his famous whistling introduction to the Oscar-nominated main theme of The High and the Mighty, accompanied by singer Johnny Desmond. The song loses the award to the title theme to Three Coins in the Fountain.

Late spring/early summer

Guaraldi's trio loses its steady gig at the hungry i, thanks to "interference" from headliner Professor Irwin Corey.

Summer (?)

Facks 2, in a combo with George Auld, sax/clarinet; Dean Reilly, bass; and Gus Gustafson, drums.

[This gig probably ran two weeks.]

Summer (?)

The Downbeat, San Francisco, in a combo with Sonny Criss, alto sax; Dean Reilly, bass; and Gus Gustafson, drums.

Summer (?)

At the request of Helen Noga, co-owner of the Blackhawk, Guaraldi's trio -- with Eddie Duran, guitar; and Dean Reilly, bass -- accompanies "a young, talented male singer" for an audition tape. Roughly 20 songs were recorded one afternoon at the club, and the resulting tapes were sent to Columbia ... and this launched the career of 19-year-old Johnny Mathis. Helen Noga subsequently became Mathis' manager.

August 4

At the Fantasy Records studio, as part of the Ron Crotty Trio -- along with Eddie Duran, guitar -- to record three tracks for what would become the album Modern Music from San Francisco, released in March of 1956.

Tracks recorded: "The Night We Called It a Day," "(I'm Afraid) The Masquerade Is Over" and "Ginza." Guaraldi wrote "Ginza."

August [unspecified]

At the Fantasy Records studio, heading his own quartet -- along with Jerry Dodgion, alto sax; Eugene Wright, bass; and John Markham, drums -- to record two tracks for what would become the album Modern Music from San Francisco, released in March of 1956.

Tracks recorded: "Between 8th and 10th on Mission Street" and "Calling Dr. Funk." Guaraldi wrote "Calling Dr. Funk."

[This session marks Guaraldi's LP debut as leader of his own combo.]

August 11

Guaraldi and his wife welcome the arrival of their son, David Anthony.

August 28

Wheeler Auditorium, UC Berkeley, as part of "Jazz: San Francisco." The Vince Guaraldi Trio -- Eddie Duran, guitar; and Dean Reilly, bass -- performs on its own, and also as part of the Cal Tjader Septet, which also includes Brew Moore, sax; Bob Collins, trombone; and Bobby White, drums. The concert also features clarinetist Vince Cattolica's quintet; Mort Sahl provides on-stage commentary.

The entire concert is recorded by Fantasy, but -- oddly -- only two tracks eventually wind up, one each, on two of Fantasy's Brew Moore albums: "Fools Rush In," on The Brew Moore Quintet; and "Dues Blues," on Brew Moore. To date, the entire concert never has been released.

The Guaraldi trio's performance is known to have included one of his original compositions, "One Man's Famine," which never is included on an album (although it came close; see January 11, 1956).

[The bill was supposed to have starred Dave Brubeck; Tjader's band was a late substitution.]

September through December

The hungry i, with Eddie Duran, guitar; and Dean Reilly, bass.

December 31

Philadelphia, performing with Woody Herman's "Third Herd." Guaraldi, having replaced departing pianist Norman Pockrandt, spends the bulk of the next year touring with Herman's big band, joining Johnny Coppola, Burt and Dick Collins, Dud Harvey and Paul Serrano, trumpets; Wayne Andre and Bob Lamb, trombones; Cy Touff, bass trumpet; Richie Kamuca, Bob Hardaway and Arno Marsh, tenor sax; Jay Cameron, baritone sax; Monty Budwig, bass; Will Bradley Jr., drums; and Victor Feldman, vibes.

This concert is broadcast live by Philadelphia's WCAU-TV Channel 10.

 

1956

Unspecified

Dave Glickman and Ray Gorum open a new San Francisco nightclub at 473 Broadway: the Jazz Workshop. Within a year, the venue becomes one of the city's top jazz hangouts.

January 2

The Storyville Club, Boston, Massachusetts, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

January 8

The Liberty Ballroom, South River, New Jersey, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

January 9

The RCA Plant, Harrison, New Jersey, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

January 11

At a New York studio, recording a session for a potential LP on the Keynote label, with Richie Kamuca, tenor sax; Monty Budwig, bass; and Joe Morello, drums. The album never materializes; the session tapes are believed lost.

Tracks recorded: "A Gal in Calico," "It's You or No One," "It Had to Be You," "Lost April," "Moonlight Becomes You," "The Night Has a Thousand Eyes," "Ginza" and "One Man's Famine." Guaraldi wrote "Ginza" and "One Man's Famine."

January 13-14

Sampson Air Force Base, Seneca Lake, New York, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

January 15

Dellwood Ballroom, Buffalo, New York, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

January 16-18

Palace Theater, Hamilton, Ontario, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

January 20-21

Basin Street, New York City, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

January 22

Ritz Ballroom, Bridgeport, Connecticut, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

January 23-27

Peps Musical Bar, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

January 28

Sunnybrook, Pottstown, Pennsylvania, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

January 29

New York (venue unspecified), with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

January 30-February 4

Peps Musical Bar, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 5

New York City (venue unspecified), with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 6

Patterson, New Jersey (venue unspecified), with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 7

Post Field House, Fort Meade, Maryland, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 8

Broyles Skateland, Salisbury, Maryland, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 10-11

Clemson Dining Hall, Clemson, South Carolina, with Woody Herman's Third Herd, performing at Clemson College's Midwinter Ball.

February 12

The Officers Club, Cherry Point, North Carolina, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 13-14

Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base, Onslow County, North Carolina, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 17-18

Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 19

The Standard Club, Atlanta, Georgia, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 21

The Timuquana Country Club, Jacksonville, Florida, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 23

The Coliseum, St. Petersburg, Florida, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 24

The San Jose Country Club, Jacksonville, Florida, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 26

MacDill Air Force Base Officers Club, Tampa, Florida, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

February 29

The Officers Club, Fort Benning, Columbus, Georgia, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 3-4

The Walahaja Hotel, Atlanta, Georgia, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 7

In a New York studio, with Woody Herman's Third Herd, recording four tracks: "You Took Advantage of Me," "Wonderful One," "For All We Know" and "To Love Again."

The latter two are released on a single, Capitol 14578; the first two aren't released for decades until the arrival of Mosaic's six-CD box set, The Complete Capitol Recordings of Woody Herman, in 2000.

March 9

The Roger Sherman Theater, New Haven, Connecticut, with Woody Herman's Third Herd. For the rest of March, the tour shares the bill at each stop with Louis Armstrong and his All Stars.

March 10

The Worchester Auditorium, Worchester, Massachusetts, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 11

Boston Symphony Hall, Boston, Massachusetts, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 12

The Veterans War Memorial Auditorium, Providence, Rhode Island, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 13

Fabian's Palace Theater, Albany, New York, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 14

The Stanley Theater, Utica, New York, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 15

Massey Hall, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

Mid-March

Fantasy releases Modern Museum from San Francisco.

March 16

The Auditorium Theater, Rochester, New York, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 17

Carnegie Hall, New York City, with Woody Herman's Third Herd (a midnight show).

March 18

The Mosque Auditorium, Richmond, Virginia, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 20

Muhlenberg College, Allentown, Pennsylvania, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 21

The Syria Mosque, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 22

The Fox Theater, Brooklyn, New York, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 23

The Academy of Music, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 26

Grand Rapids, Michigan (venue unspecified), with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 28

The George Huff Gym, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 29

The RKO Orpheum, Davenport, Illinois, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

March 31

The Masonic Auditorium, Detroit, Michigan, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

Early April

In the Fantasy Records studio -- with Eddie Duran, guitar; and Dean Reilly, bass -- recording Guaraldi's debut Fantasy album, Vince Guaraldi Trio, released later the same year, in September.

Tracks recorded: "Chelsea Bridge," "Django," "Fascinatin' Rhythm," "Fenwyck Farfel," "It's De-Lovely," "The Lady's in Love with You," "Never Never Land," "Ossobucco," "Sweet and Lovely" and "Three Coins in the Fountain." Guaraldi wrote "Fenwyck Farfel."

April 11

The Field House, Villanova, Pennsylvania, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 12

The Fort Miles Field House, Lewes, Delaware, with Woody Herman's Third Herd, performing for the St. Peter's Episcopal Church Spring Formal Dance.

April 13

Sunnybrook Park, Pottstown, Pennsylvania, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 14

The Broadwood Hotel, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 15

The Liberty Ballroom, South River, New Jersey, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 16

The State Armory, Gloversville, New York, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 17

The State Armory, Rutland, Vermont, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 18

The Hartwick College Gym, Oneoneta, New York, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 20

The Men's Quad, Bloomington, Indiana, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 21

The Men's Quad, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, with Woody Herman's Third Herd, helping to celebrate the university's Greek Week.

April 22

The Roof Ballroom, Indianapolis, Indiana, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 23

Live performance at an unspecified TV studio, Chicago Illinois, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 24

Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, with Woody Herman's Third Herd, helping celebrate the university's 75th anniversary.

April 25

An unspecified high school gym, Oxford, Wisconsin, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 26

The Modernistic Ballroom, Clinton, Iowa, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 27

Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 28

Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 29

Meadow Acres, Topeka, Kansas, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

April 30

The Trig Ballroom, Wichita, Kansas, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 1

Oklahoma A&M, Stillwater, Oklahoma, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 2

Union Concert, Norman, Oklahoma, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 3

Oklahoma City (venue unspecified), with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 4

The University of Arkansas Gym, Fayetteville, Arkansas, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 5

The University Memorial Center, Boulder, Colorado, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 6

The NCO Club, Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado Springs, Colorado, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 7

Colorado Springs City Auditorium, Colorado, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 9

Kansas City Country Club, Kansas City, Kansas, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 10-12

Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa, with Woody Herman's Third Herd, celebrating the college's 35th annual Veishea Festival.

May 13

The Connolly Gym, Monroe City, Missouri, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 14-16

In a Chicago recording studio with Herman's band, laying down tracks for what eventually would become Woody Herman's Capitol LP, Blue's Groove.

Tracks recorded: "Blues Groove," "Call It Stormy Monday," "Dupree Blues," "5-10-15 Hours," "I Don't Want Nobody (To Have My Love but You)," "I Want a Little Girl," "Pinetop's Blues," "Smack Dab in the Middle" and "Trouble in Mind."

"I Don't Want Nobody (To Have My Love but You)" and "5-10-15 Hours" do not make it onto the album. The former is paired with "To Love Again" and released on a Capitol single; the latter remains "lost" until resurrected for Mosaic's Complete Capitol Recordings of Woody Herman.

The band personnel has changed slightly: Cy Touff and Paul Serrano have moved on, the latter replaced by Bill Castagnino on trumpet; Bill Harris has joined the trombone section; Gus Gustafson has taken over for Will Bradley Jr. on drums; and guitarist Ray Biondi has joined the crew.

May 17

Valparaiso, Indiana (venue unspecified), with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 18

Jefferson High School, Lafayette, Indiana, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 19

The Edgewater Beach Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 20

The George Divine Ballroom, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

May 26

The Crystal Palace, Paw Paw Lake, Coloma, Michigan, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

June

George Andros, owner/manager of Fack's, opens a sister establishment -- Fack's II -- at 960 Bush Street, also in San Francisco.

[Many years later, after another intermediate ownership change, this site will become much more famous under a new name, as the Boarding House.]

June 3

Meyers Lake Amusement Park, Canton, Ohio, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

June 9

The Palace Ballroom, Old Orchard Beach, Maine, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

June 11

Whalom Park, Lunenburg, Massachusetts, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

June 14

The New Bel-Air Ballroom, Mountain Park, Holyoke, Massachusetts, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

June 21-27

Basin Street, New York City, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

June 29

The Steel Pier, Atlantic City, New Jersey, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

July 6

Danceland, Ocean City, Maryland, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

July 7

Hersbey Park Ballroom, Derry Township, Pennsylvania, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

July 8

Crystal Beach Park, Vermilion, Ohio, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

July 9

Rainbow Gardens, Erie, Pennsylvania, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

July 23

The Cobblestone Ballroom, Storm Lake, Iowa, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

July 27-29

The Lagoon Amusement Park, Salt Lake City, Utah, with Woody Herman's Third Herd.

The performances on the second and third evenings were recorded and eventually released on CD in 2000, as Woody Herman and his Orchestra 1956.

August 3-late the same month

The Bal Tabarin Casino, Lake Tahoe, Nevada, performing with the downsized Woody Herman Octet: Herman, Dick Collins and John Coppola, trumpets; Bob Hardaway, tenor sax; Bill Harris, trombone; Guaraldi, piano; Monty Budwig, bass; and Victor Feldman, drums and vibes.

As the booking begins, Herman's Octet shares the bill with singer Herb Jeffries, and blues vocalist Diane Lefti and her Right Hand Men. Mid-month, the other two acts are replaced by the Mary Kaye Trio.

Although Herman's booking continues through September 2, Guaraldi leaves the band shortly before the end of the month, and is replaced by John Bunch.

September 3-16

The Macumba, San Francisco, as part of Cal Tjader's new quintet: Eugene "Gene" Wright, bass; Jesse Cooley, drums; and Luis Kant, congas. Tjader's band shares the bill with Jeri Southern.

Very shortly into this gig, Cooley bows out due to a family emergency; he is replaced by Al Torre, who becomes a permanent member of the band.

Mid-September

Fantasy Records releases Vince Guaraldi Trio.

September 18-30

Peacock Lane, Hollywood, with Cal Tjader's Quintet; the band shares the bill with Chet Baker.

October 2-28

The Macumba, with Cal Tjader's Quintet

October 5

Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, at a benefit jazz concert hosted by Jimmy Lyons. Guaraldi performed both as the leader of his own trio, and as a member of Cal Tjader's Quintet; the program also features Brew Moore and Turk Murphy.

Early through mid-November

A Pacific Northwest tour, with Cal Tjader's Quintet. The tour includes stops at Birdland and Dave's Fifth Avenue Tavern (the latter on November 12), both in Seattle.

November

At the Fantasy Records studio, for a recording session supporting baritone horn player Gus Mancusco, joined by Cal Tjader, drums; Richie Kamuca, tenor sax; and Gene Wright, bass). These three songs, along with others recorded during earlier sessions, eventually are used to fill the Fantasy LP Introducing Gus Mancuso, released in March of 1957.

Tracks recorded: "Brother Aintz," "And Baby Makes Three" and "A Hatful of Dandruff." Guaraldi wrote "A Hatful of Dandruff."

November 21

The Coyote Point Campus Cafeteria, College of San Mateo, California, with Cal Tjader's Quintet. This booking is part of a Northern California college "mini-tour" that also includes appearances at Chico State University and the College of Marin, Kentfield.

November 24

The Pasadena Civic Auditorium, with Cal Tjader's Quintet (somebody subbed for Torre), as part of the bill featured in one of Gene Norman's "Modern Sounds" events. The other stars are the George Shearing Quintet, the Hi-Lo's and the Dave Pell Octet.

Late November-early December

A Western tour, with Cal Tjader's Quintet. The tour includes a stop in Denver, probably at Sonny's Lounge.

December 26-January 20

The Blackhawk, San Francisco, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

The band initially shares billing with the Virgil Gonsalves Sextet.

 

1957

Through January 20

The Blackhawk, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

From January 11-13, the band shares billing with Billie Holiday.

Tjader's Jazz at the Blackhawk is recorded live on the final evening (Tjader's first live album). Luis Kant sits the session out; the album is recorded with a quartet, because Tjader wanted a straight-ahead album; it's released four months later, in May.

Tracks recorded: "Bill B.," "Blues in the Night," "I'll Remember April," "I've Never Been in Love Before," "Land's End," "Lover, Come Back to Me," "Thinking of You, MJQ," "Two for Blues Suite" and "When the Sun Comes Out." Guaraldi wrote "Thinking of You, MJQ."

January 25

The San Jose Civic Auditorium, with Cal Tjader's Quintet -- now billed as Cal Tjader's Mambo Jazz Quintet -- sharing the stage with Dizzy Gillespie's 17-piece orchestra.

January 26

The American Legion Hall, Redwood City, California, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for a dance concert.

January 27

Berkeley Community Theater, with Cal Tjader's Mambo Jazz Quintet, sharing the stage with Dizzy Gillespie's 17-piece orchestra.

[A flawed PA system compromised the Tjader combo's performance.]

February 2

The Pasadena Civic Auditorium, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for another Gene Norman "Modern Sounds" concert. The bill includes June Christy; Shelly Manne and his Trio, featuring Andre Previn; and the Four Freshmen.

February 7-17

Zucca's Cottage, Pasadena, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

February 10

The American Legion Hall, Pasadena, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for a concert sponsored by the San Gabriel Valley Jazz Club.

[This was in the afternoon, so that the band could keep its evening booking at Zucca's Cottage.]

February 11

A live studio appearance on KABC-TV's Stars of Jazz, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

The set list features "Bernie's Tune," "Jammin,' " "Lover Come Back to Me" and "The Night We Called It a Day."

This session eventually is released on the 1976 Calliope LP Sessions, Live: Cal Tjader/Chico Hamilton.

[The full video footage is believed lost.]

Mid-February

Capitol Records releases Woody Herman's Blues Groove.

February 22-April 21

The Interlude, Hollywood, with Cal Tjader's Quintet

March 22

The Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for a Latin and Calypso Festival concert. The bill includes Noro Morales, Joe Loco, Josephine Premice and Tony Martinez

April 7

The Rainbow Gardens Ballroom, Pomona, California, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, sharing the bill with "Treni Menor and his Latin American music."

April 10, 11 and 15

At the Fantasy Records studios with Cal Tjader, Gene Wright and Al Torre -- once again, Luis Kant is left behind -- assembling the tracks for what becomes the LP Cal Tjader, released in January of 1958.

Tracks recorded April 10: "Line for Lyons" and a Porgy and Bess Suite.

Track recorded April 11: "And Baby Makes Three."

Tracks recorded April 15: "Our Blues" (written by Patricia Tjader and Shirley Guaraldi), "That's All," "When Lights Are Low" and a medley of "Lover Man," " 'Round Midnight" and "Willow Weep for Me."

April 16

At the Fantasy Records studios, fronting his own trio -- with Eddie Duran, guitar; and Dean Reilly, bass -- recording his second Fantasy album, A Flower Is a Lovesome Thing. The LP is released in April 1958.

Tracks recorded: "Autumn Leaves," "A Flower Is a Lovesome Thing," "Like a Mighty Rose," "Lonely Girl," "Looking for a Boy," "Softly, as in a Morning Sunrise," "Willow Weep for Me" and "Yesterdays." Guaraldi wrote "Like a Mighty Rose."

Mid April-Mid May (?)

The Sombrero Ballroom, Los Angeles, with Cal Tjader's Quintet (Sundays only).

May 16-25

Zucca's Cottage, Pasadena, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

May

Fantasy Records releases Tjader's Jazz at the Blackhawk.

May 26-27

The Vista de Oro recording studio, Los Angeles, as part of an octet -- Frank Rosolino, trombone; Conte Candoli and Ed Leddy, trumpet; Monty Budwig, bass; and Stan Levey, drums -- to support tenor saxman Richie Kamuca and baritone saxophonist/arranger Bill Hollman, for their LP Jazz Erotica.

Tracks recorded: "Angel Eyes," "Blue Jazz," "I Hadn't Anyone Till You," "Indiana," "It's You or No One," "Linger Awhile," "Star Eyes," "Stella by Starlight," "The Things We Did Last Summer" and "Way Down Under."

[This album, released in November 1957, soon undergoes a name change; it is re-released in 1959 as West Coast Jazz in Hifi. This leads to confusion that exists to this day, with numerous sources incorrectly claiming that the LP first was released in 1959.]

Early June-June 13

The Interlude, Hollywood, with Cal Tjader's Quintet

June

In a Hollywood recording studio, as part of a quintet -- along with Richie Kamuca, tenor sax; Monty Budwig, bass; and Stan Levey, drums -- to support trombonist Frank Rosolino, for his Mode Records LP The Legend of Frank Rosolino, released one month later.

Tracks recorded: "Cherry," "Fallout," "Fine Shape," "How Long Has This Been Going On," "Let's Make It," "They Say," "Thou Swell" and "Tuffy."

June

In a Hollywood recording studio, as part of a quartet -- along with Monty Budwig, bass; and Stan Levey, drums -- to support trumpeter Conte Candoli, for his Mode Records LP The Conte Candoli Quartet, released a few months later, in October.

Tracks recorded: "Flamingo," "Mambo Blues," "Mediolistic," "No Moon at All," "Something for Liza," "Tara Ferma" and "Walkie Talkie."

June 14-27

The Los Angeles Jazz Concert Hall, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for an ambitious program titled "A Salute to West Coast Jazz." The bill also features Shelly Manne and his Men, Jackie Chin and the Roy Kral/Ben Webster Group

[The program listed Guaraldi and Kant as "Vince Guroldi" and "Luis Grant."]

June 17

Cal Tjader signs with Universal Pictures to film a short musical sequence with his quintet for the movie The Big Beat. Filming probably takes place in late June.

A second taping session, possibly the same day, records the Tjader Quintet performing one song, "Tumbao," for the two-reeler short, Salute to Song.

June 28-July 11

Ciro's, West Hollywood, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

[Two sources -- Variety and the Oakland Tribune -- claim that a Blackhawk gig started on this date; they must be wrong, since a promotional folder from Ciro's is much harder evidence.]

July 12-18

Peacock Lane, Hollywood, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

July 19-25

Ciro's, as part of Cal Tjader's Quartet -- absent Luis Kant -- to help open the club's new Ciroette Room.

July 30-September 29

The Blackhawk, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

Dave Brubeck shares the bill August 17-18, and again September 7-15; the Jean Hoffman Trio shares the bill September 17-29.

September 10

In the Fantasy Records studio with Cal Tjader's Quintet, recording four tracks that wound up in all sorts of places. Drummer Al Torre is replaced by newcomer Bayardo "Benny" Velarde on timbales.

"Tumbao" wound up on Mas Ritmo Caliente, released in April 1958.

"I've Waited So Long" and "Mambo at the M" eventually were released on Cal Tjader Goes Latin, in August 1959.

"As I Love You" never is issued on an LP; it only was paired with "I've Waited So Long" and released as a Fantasy 45 single.

October 1-29

The London House, Chicago, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

October 11

In a Chicago recording studio with Cal Tjader's combo: Al McKibbon, bass; Armando "Cuco" Sanchez, timbales; Armando Peraza, conga and bongos; and Luis Kant, congas. The contents of this session also would become part of the Fantasy LP Mas Ritmo Caliente.

Tracks recorded: "Armando's Hideaway," "Big Noise from Winnetka," "Cuco on Timbales," "Poinciana Cha Cha," "Ritmo Africano" and "Ritmo Rumba."

October 14

Guaraldi drives Al Torre and his fiancee, Terry-Ann, to Illinois' Cook County courthouse, so they can be married. Guaraldi and Luis Kant served as witnesses.

Early to mid-November

Birdland, New York City, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

[Marlon Brando sat in with Tjader's group one evening, and promised to "whack the bongos" for the band's next West Coast recording date. Alas, this never came about.]

November 20

In a New York recording studio with Cal Tjader's combo: Jose "Combo" Silva, tenor sax; Gerald Sanfino, alto sax and flute; Bobby Rodriguez, bass; Luis Kant, gourd and cowbell; Armando Peraza, conga and bongos; Ramon "Mongo" Santamaria, conga; and Willie Bobo, timbales. The contents of this session also would become part of the Fantasy LP Mas Ritmo Caliente.

Tracks recorded: "Mongorama," "Perdido" and "Perfidia Cha Cha."

Late November

Sonny's Lounge, Denver, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

November 30

San Francisco Civic Auditorium, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for the opening night of impresario Irving Granz's "Jazz a la Carte" extravaganza. The bill also features Ella Fitzgerald, backed by the Lou Levy Trio; the Dave Brubeck Quartet, with Paul Desmond on alto sax; the Shorty Rogers Sextet; and the Rudy Salvini Big Band.

[Shorty Rogers' band filled in for the Gerry Mulligan Quartet when Mulligan was laid up in New York with Asian flu.]

December 1 or 2

Seattle, Washington (venue unspecified), with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for the second night of impresario Irving Granz's "Jazz a la Carte" extravaganza. The bill also features Ella Fitzgerald, backed by the Lou Levy Trio; the Dave Brubeck Quartet, with Paul Desmond on alto sax; the Shorty Rogers Sextet; and the Rudy Salvini Big Band.

December 3

Vancouver, British Columbia (venue unspecified), with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for the third and final night of impresario Irving Granz's "Jazz a la Carte" extravaganza. The bill also features Ella Fitzgerald, backed by the Lou Levy Trio; the Dave Brubeck Quartet, with Paul Desmond on alto sax; the Shorty Rogers Sextet; and the Rudy Salvini Big Band.

December 16

Humboldt State College Men's Gymnasium, Arcata, California, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for the second annual Humboldt State College Jazz Concert.

December 17-January 26

The Blackhawk, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

December 18

San Francisco Civic Auditorium, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, as one of many acts sharing the bill with headliner Johnny Mathis, returning to his home city for "Johnny Mathis Day." Tjader's combo -- along with Charles Stem's band, Ronny Draper, organist Earl Grant, comic Paul Desmond and the Zack Thompson Dancers -- helped stall and keep the crowd happy when Mathis was late.

December 20

Guaraldi is taken ill with the flu, and therefore unable to join Tjader's Quintet for a benefit concert at the Oakland Civic Theater for the widow of trombonist Charles Etter; Guaraldi is replaced by guitarist Eddie Duran. The event features more than 40 musicians, including the Rudy Salvini Big Band, vocalist Ernestine Anderson, the Lonnie Hewitt Trio, Earl "Fatha" Hines, the Dickie Mills/Brew Moore Quintet and the Dave Brubeck Quartet.

 

1958

Through January 26

The Blackhawk, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

The Dave Brubeck Quartet shares the bill January 7-26.

Tjader, claiming he wants a break, surprises everybody by saying that he's breaking up the band, as soon as this gig concludes.

January

Fantasy Records releases Cal Tjader.

January 28-30

The Blackhawk, with Guaraldi heading his own trio (sidemen unknown).

February 4-?

The Jazz Showcase, San Francisco, performing with a quartet headed by Dick Saltzman, vibes, that includes Eddie Duran, guitar; and Norman Bates, bass.

February 8

At the Fantasy studio, as part of a sextet that includes Cal Tjader, vibes; Stan Getz, tenor sax; Eddie Duran, guitar; Scott LaFaro, bass; and Billy Higgins, drums. The session, recorded very smoothly, results in the Fantasy LP The Stan Getz/Cal Tjader Sextet, released in late spring/early summer of the same year.

Tracks recorded: "Big Bear," "Crow's Nest," "For All We Know," "Ginza Samba," "I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face," "Liz-Anne" and "My Buddy." Guaraldi wrote "Ginza Samba."

[Despite its slightly different name, "Ginza Samba" is the same as Guaraldi's "Ginza."]

February 21

The Pasadena Civic Auditorium, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, sharing the stage with headliner Johnny Mathis (in his debut Southern California concert), June Christy, the Lancers and Claude Gordon's 13-piece orchestra.

[Despite Tjader's desire to "rest," he agrees to gather his quintet for this Johnny Mathis tour.]

February 22

The Russ Auditorium, San Diego, for the second date in the Johnny Mathis tour (same line-up).

February 23

The UC Berkeley Men's Gym (3:45 p.m.) and the Berkeley Community Theater (8 p.m.), for the third date in the Johnny Mathis tour (same line-up at both venues).

February 24

The San Jose Civic Auditorium, for fourth date in the Johnny Mathis tour (same line-up).

February 25

Sacramento (venue unspecified), for the fifth and final date in the Johnny Mathis tour (same line-up).

February 26

The East Contra Costa Junior College Gymnasium, Concord, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

February 27 or 28

Sunset School Auditorium, Carmel, California, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

[This likely is the last appearance by this particular band.]

March

Fantasy releases Tjader's LP Mas Ritmo Caliente.

March-April

The Interlude, Los Angeles, for a five-week gig with Cal Tjader's new quintet: Al McKibbon, bass; William Correa (soon to be dubbed Willie Bobo), drums and bongos; and Ramon (Mongo) Santamaria, congas.

[Despite his desire for "rest," Tjader wastes no time assembling this new Afro-Cuban group.]

April

Fantasy Records releases Guaraldi's A Flower Is a Lovesome Thing.

Late April/Late May

A Southern California road trip (venues unspecified), with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

May 27-June 1

Harvey's Wagon Wheel, Lake Tahoe's South Shore, Stateline, Nevada, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

June 2-5

The Senator Hotel, Sacramento, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

June 6-22

Harvey's Wagon Wheel, Lake Tahoe's South Shore, Stateline, Nevada, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

June 30

A live studio appearance on KABC-TV's Stars of Jazz, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

The set list features "Bill B.," "Crow's Nest," "Liz-Anne" and "Tumbao."

This session eventually is released on the 1976 Calliope LP Sessions, Live: Cal Tjader, Chris Connor and Paul Togawa..

[The show footage exists, albeit only in private hands.]

July 4-September 14

The Blackhawk, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

July

Carmel (venue unspecified), with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

This performance serves as a Monterey Jazz Festival "preview concert" for Jimmy Lyons.

August 14, 21, 28

Live appearances at San Francisco's KQED-TV Channel 9, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for programs aired at 8:30 p.m.

August 26-31

Flutist Paul Horn joins Tjader's band at the Blackhawk for this single week.

Late August

At the Fantasy Records studio, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, to record Tjader's LP Latin for Lovers, released in December.

Flutist Paul Horn's San Francisco visit is prompted by his participation on this album, further augmented by a string quartet.

Tracks recorded: "Alone Together," "I Should Care," "Martha," "Ode to a Beat Generation," "Quizas, Quizas, Quizas," "Skylark," "Spring Is Here," "Star Eyes," "Stella by Starlight" and "Time Was."

August 30

Guaraldi is announced as the first musician signed to perform at the upcoming debut Monterey Jazz Festival. Although the announcement implies that he'll front his own band, in fact Guaraldi only performs as part of Cal Tjader's Quintet.

August 31

The Monterey Jazz Festival schedule, released on this day, confirms Guaraldi's presence as part of Cal Tjader's Quintet.

September 4, 11, 18

Live appearances at San Francisco's KQED-TV Channel 9, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for programs aired at 8:30 p.m.

September

During this month of the long run at the Blackhawk, Tjader's Quintet records the live Fantasy LP Cal Tjader's Latin Concert, released just one month later, in October.

Tracks recorded: "The Continental," "Cubano Chant," "Lucero," "Mi Guaguanco," "Mood for Milt," "Theme," "Tu Crees Que," "Viva Cepeda" and "A Young Love."

September 19

The American Legion Hall, Redwood City, California, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for a dance concert.

September 20

The San Jose Civic Auditorium, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, sharing the stage with headliner Nat King Cole, Jeri Southern, Gogi Grant and Nelson Riddle's 19-piece orchestra.

September 21

Berkeley Community Theater, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, sharing the stage with headliner Nat King Cole, Jeri Southern, Gogi Grant and Nelson Riddle's 19-piece orchestra.

October 4

The first annual Monterey Jazz Festival, with Cal Tjader's Quintet. The band is joined by clarinetist Buddy DeFranco on two songs.

Tjader's group takes the stage shortly after midnight, and wows the crowd with a history-making performance.

October

Fantasy Records releases Cal Tjader's album Cal Tjader's Latin Concert.

November 1

The Rainbow Gardens Ballroom, Pomona, California, with Cal Tjader's Quintet. The bill includes the Luis Arcaraz Orchestra.

November 6

Phillips Hall, Santa Ana College, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for a pair of concerts for the College Jazz Festival.

November 7

The Hacienda Fiesta Room, Bakersfield, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

November 18-late January

The Blackhawk, with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

Jose "Chombo" Silva joins the group from December 2-16 (latter date uncertain), and Fantasy records several sessions during this visit.

Tracks recorded: "Bill B.," "Blue and Sentimental," "I Hadn't Anyone Till You," "I Love Paris," "A Night in Tunisia," "Stompin' at the Savoy" and "Mazacote."

The first six tracks becomes Tjader's album A Night at the Blackhawk, released in September 1959. The final track is saved for Mongo Santamaria's second Fantasy album, Mongo, also released in September 1959.

[Blackhawk ads for this appearance offer "Tjazz by Tjader."]

November 19-?

Guaraldi serves as guest piano instructor for Ilene Holmgren's adult education jazz piano class in Albany, California's University Village.

November 20

UC Berkeley's Wheeler Auditorium, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, for the annual Big Game Week Jazz Concert.

November 23 and 30

The Avalon Ballroom, San Francisco, with Cal Tjader's Quintet, augmented by Manny and Carlos Duran and two unidentified horn players.

These Sunday dance concerts are billed as "Dance to Cal Tjader's Big Band."

December

Fantasy Records releases Cal Tjader's LP Latin for Lovers.

 

1959

Mid-January

Guaraldi leaves Cal Tjader's Quintet during its run at the Blackhawk, and is replaced by Lonnie Hewitt.

Tjader's new group remains at the Blackhawk through February 8.

January 20-?

Lennie's, in San Leandro, California, on Tuesday evenings, as part of tenor saxman Harold Wylie's Quartet: Jerry Good, bass; and John Markham, drums.

Early February

According to Variety, Guaraldi is "rehearsing a group of his own."

February 21

The Berkeley Community Theater, backing singer Anita O'Day, as an opener for headliner Shelly Berman. With George Morrow, bass; and John Pool, drums. The bill also includes the Mastersounds Quartet.

March 2

In a Los Angeles recording studio, for the first session used on what becomes vibraphonist Victor Feldman's album Latinsville.

This session features Feldman, Guaraldi, Conte Candoli, trumpet; Frank Rosolino, trombone; Walter Benton, tenor sax; Scott LaFaro, bass; Stan Levey, drums; Willie Bobo, timbales; Mongo Santamaria, congas; and Armando Peraza, bongos.

Tracks recorded: "Cuban Love Song," "Poinciana," "Spain" and "Woody 'n' You."

March 3

In a Los Angeles recording studio, for the second session used on what becomes vibraphonist Victor Feldman's album Latinsville.

This session features Feldman, Guaraldi, Conte Candoli, trumpet; Walter Benton, tenor sax; Scott LaFaro, bass; Willie Bobo, timbales; Mongo Santamaria, congas; and Armando Peraza, bongos.

Tracks recorded: "The Gypsy" and "In a Little Spanish Town."

March 20

In a Los Angeles recording studio, for the third session used on what becomes vibraphonist Victor Feldman's album Latinsville.

This session features Feldman, Guaraldi, Conte Candoli, trumpet; Walter Benton, tenor sax; Al McKibbon, bass; Willie Bobo, timbales; Mongo Santamaria, congas; and Armando Peraza, bongos.

Tracks recorded: "Flying Down to Rio," "Lady of Spain" and "South of the Border."

[Feldman leads one more recording session on May 4, without Guaraldi, before deciding that he has enough for an album. Latinsville is released in January 1961.]

March 24

The UC Berkeley Men's Gym, fronting his own trio (sidemen unspecified), and sharing the stage with the headlining Kingston Trio. The bill also includes Ronnie Schell and the Dick McKibben Quartet.

March 25

The Westbay Room of Mr. Smith's, San Francisco, in a quartet headed by saxman Pony Poindexter, with Eddie Kahn, bass; and Frank Jones, drums.

The event is a Charlie Parker memorial concert; the bill also includes alto saxmen Bob Land and Leo Wright, and drummer Larry Marable.

April 4

Royal Festival Hall, London, England, performing with Woody Herman's "Anglo-American Herd," a blended band of American and British (and Canadian) musicians. Guaraldi remains with Herman's unit for about a month. For this British tour, he joins Americans Nat Adderley, cornet; Reunald Jones, trumpet; Bill Harris, trombone; Zoot Sims, tenor sax; Keter Betts, bass; Charlie Byrd, guitar; and Jimmy Campbell, drums. The British contingent is Les Condon, Kenny Wheeler and Bert Courtley, trumpets; Ken Wray and Eddie Harvey, trombones; Don Rendell, Art Ellefson and Johnny Scott, tenor saxes; and Ronnie Ross, baritone sax.

April 5

The Gaumont Cinema House, Southampton, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 6

Colston Hall, Bristol, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 7

The Odeon Cinema, Plymouth, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 8

The Civic Hall, Wolverhampton, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 9

City Hall, Sheffield, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 10

The Pavilion, Scunthorpe, North Lincolnshire, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 11

The Odeon Cinema, Leeds, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 12

The Odeon Cinema, Birmingham, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 13

De Montfort Hall, Leicester, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 14

City Hall, Hull, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 15

The Odeon Cinema, Newcastle, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 16

The Odeon Cinema, Glasgow, Scotland, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 17

Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 18

The Free Trade Hall, Manchester, England, performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

These two concerts are recorded and released many years later, in 1980, as the obscure British LP Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

April 19

The Granada, Walthamstow, England (4 p.m.), performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

The Granada, Tooting, England (7:30 p.m.), performing with Woody Herman's Anglo-American Herd.

Late April

Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, with an American septet headed by Woody Herman, performing for the employees of the Aramco Oil Company.

The booking runs eight days and is known to have included Herman, Guaraldi, Nat Adderley, Bill Harris, Keter Betts and Zoot Sims ... but the other player remains a mystery.

Following this booking, Herman returns to New York, where Guaraldi is replaced by French pianist Bernard Peiffer.

June 19-?

Crim's, Oakland, in a quartet billed as The Sensationals: Jim DeBaca, alto sax; Ted Spinola, string and electric bass; and Phil Martinez, drums.

The group played Friday and Saturday evenings.

August 7-16

The Caffe Court, Palo Alto, California, with his own trio -- sidemen unspecified -- backing singer Valerie Knight, during a benefit for the new venue's gala opening.

[This venue is soon to be renamed Outside at the Inside.]

August 17-23

Las Vegas, "to join Woody Herman for a week."

August 31-March/April 1960

The Lighthouse, Hermosa Beach, California, performing with bassist Howard Rumsey and the Lighthouse All-Stars: Art Pepper, saxophone; Conte Candoli, trumpet; and Nick Martinez, drums.

[One source claims Guaraldi remains with the All-Stars for "roughly a year"; this seems unlikely, as he was known to be back in Northern California as of May 1960.]

September

Fantasy Records releases Cal Tjader's A Night at the Blackhawk, Mongo Santamaria's Mongo and Tjader's Cal Tjader Goes Latin. The latter, which includes Guaraldi's participation on tracks recorded in September 1957 and December 1958, is Tjader's final album with "new" material by the pianist.

December 21

Orfeu Negro (Black Orpheus) is released in the United States. Guaraldi sees the film many times, loves its music, and soon develops the notion to record his own jazz-hued arrangements of the score's four primary themes. A few years will pass before he turns this concept into reality.

 

1960

Winter

Sausalito's French restaurant, Ondine, opens a second dining establishment on the ground floor of their building, at 558 Bridgeway Street. The new supper club is called the Yacht Dock, reflecting the fact that customers can arrive by boat, if so desired.

Through March/April

The Lighthouse, Hermosa Beach, performing with bassist Howard Rumsey and the Lighthouse All-Stars.

February 3

A recording studio in Hollywood, supporting trumpeter Conte Candoli for what would become his album Little Band, Big Jazz, released later in the year. The combo also features Buddy Collette, tenor sax; Leroy Vinnegar, bass; and Stan Levey, drums.

Tracks recorded: "Countin' the Blues," "Little David," "Macedonia," "Mambo Diane," "Muggin' the Minor" and "Zizanie." Guaraldi wrote "Little David" and "Macedonia," the former in honor of his young son.

February 16

Guaraldi briefly returns to San Francisco, to celebrate the birth of his daughter, Dia Lisa.

March 17

Pierce College cafetorium, Woodland Hills, California, with the Lighthouse All-Stars.

April 12

The Blackhawk, as an emergency fill-in for Thelonious Monk, who missed his plane; Guaraldi played with Monk's group: Charles Rouse, tenor sax; John Ore, bass; and Billy Higgins, drums.

May 18-June 29

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Saxman Brew Moore and trombonist Bob Collins join on Thursday evenings.

The show also features comic Lord Buckley, singers Ada Moore and Letti Luz, and the Tommy Conine Dance Trio.

The Wayfarers join the bill in mid-June.

[Guaraldi's combo remains the house band for close to a full year.]

June 30-August 14

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

Guaraldi's trio is made part of venue owner Michael DuPont's "intimate jazz revue," titled Things Are Swingin'. The bill includes singers Mary Ann McCall and Ada Moore; and the Tommy Conine Dance Trio.

July 8

Fack's II is closed by the Internal Revenue Service, for nonpayment of taxes.

August 18-21

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The bill stars headliner Red Norvo and his Quintet, along with comic George Lemont, singer David Allyn, and the Tommy Conine Dance Trio.

August 26-27

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The bill also features singers David Allyn and Irene Kral.

August 29-September 14

Basin Street East, New York, accompanying singer June Christie (sidemen unspecified).

[Guaraldi's protege, Larry Vuckovich, holds his spot at Outside at the Inside, supporting Irene Kral and David Allyn.]

September 15

Guaraldi rejoins his trio at Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto.

September 23-25

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The headliner is Cal Tjader's Quintet, along with George Lemont, Freddie Paris and the Tommy Conine Dance Trio.

September 26

A new jazz club, Neve, opens at 960 Bush Street, the site formerly occupied by Fack's II.

September 30-October 2

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

Guaraldi's trio is made part of another jazz revue, this one titled Having Fun, starring singer Bobbie Norris and also featuring George Lemont, Freddie Paris and the Tommy Conine Dance Trio.

October 7-?

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The headliner is the Barney Kessell Quintet, along with George Lemont and the Tommy Conine Dance Trio.

October 21-23

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The headliner is Red Norvo and his Quintet, along with George Lemont.

November 10

Although not mentioned in the article itself, Guaraldi is included in a group photo on the cover of the November 10 issue of Downbeat, which features an article on the San Francisco jazz scene.

November 10-12

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The headliners are tenor saxman Ben Webster and blues singer Jimmy Witherspoon, along with RCA Victor recording stars Penny and Jean.

November 18-20

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The headliner is jazz vocalist Toni Harper, along with George Lemont and the Tommy Conine Dance Trio.

November 25-December 4

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The headliner is jazz vocalist Helen Humes, along with George Lemont and the Tommy Conine Dance Trio.

December 9-?

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The bill includes George Lemont, Three for the Show, and Tony Mendell.

December 23-?

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The bill includes Freddy Paris, and Three for the Show.

 

1961

January 13-15

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The headliner is vocalist Faith Winthrop, along with the Tommy Conine Dance Trio.

January

The Contemporary label releases Victor Feldman's album, Latinsville.

January 20-?

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The bill includes song-and-dance comic Reggie Mason, and Carolyn Joyce.

February 16

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto. This evening's concert by Guaraldi's trio is broadcast at 10 p.m. on KHIP 106.9 FM.

February 17-?

Outside at the Inside, Palo Alto, heading his own trio -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- as house band.

The bill includes Joe and Eddy, and Christine Pernot.

April

The Blackhawk, with his trio (sidemen unspecified).

May 2-?

Opus One, San Francisco, with his trio -- sidemen unspecified -- supporting owner and jazz/pop singer Champ Butler.

May 7

San Francisco State, with his trio -- Monty Budwig, bass; Benny Barth, drums -- for the first Intercollegiate Jazz Festival.

The performers include Frank Rosolino, trombone; Richie Kamuca, tenor sax; and Conte Condoli, trumpet.

Mid-May

The Jazz Workshop, San Francisco, with his trio -- sidemen unspecified -- supporting singer Bill Henderson and alto saxman Frank Strozier.

May 19

The Trois Couleurs club opens in Berkeley.

[Guaraldi isn't present, but this club will prove important to him in a few years.]

June

The Yacht Dock, Sausalito, California, with Monty Budwig, bass; and Benny Barth, drums.

July

The Jazz Workshop, with Guaraldi's trio -- Monty Budwig, bass; Benny Barth, drums -- backing tenor saxman Gene Ammons.

Colin Bailey replaces Barth midway through this gig.

August 8-November

The Trident, Sausalito, with Monty Budwig, bass, and Colin Bailey, drums.

[The Trident is the new identity of the wholly renovated and remodeled Yacht Dock. Guaraldi's trio opens the place and remains the name entertainment, six nights per week, for four months.]

October 6-?

Jack Gelber's The Connection, a dramatic play about drug addiction, opens at San Francisco's Contemporary Dancers Center. The production features "new music" by Guaraldi, although he doesn't perform the score; that honor goes to the Paul Humphrey Quartet (Humphrey, Fred Marshall, Sonny King and Flip Nunez).

[No recordings of Guaraldi's score are known to have survived.]

December 26-January 7

The Jazz Workshop, with his trio -- Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- supporting blues singer Jimmy Witherspoon and tenor saxman Ben Webster.

 

1962

Through January 7

The Jazz Workshop, with his trio -- Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- supporting blues singer Jimmy Witherspoon and tenor saxman Ben Webster.

January 1

San Quentin Prison -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- as part of the ambitious bill for the prison's 47th annual Show of Stars. The other performers include Ben Webster and Jimmy Witherspoon, Luz Garcia's Sinaloa Club, singer Ketty Lester, comedians Higgy King and JoAnne, and the performance group Three for the Show.

January 4

At San Francisco's KQED-TV Channel 9 studio, with his trio -- Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- recording an episode of Ralph Gleason's Jazz Casual show, backing Ben Webster and Jimmy Witherspoon.

The set features "Chelsea Bridge," "I'm Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town," "Cottontail," "Roll 'em Pete," "T'Ain't Nobody's Biz-ness if I Do" and "Times Getting Tougher." The audio eventually is released on CD in 2001; the full show also is made available on VHS tape and DVD (the latter only in the Region 2 format, however).

Early January

The British Stateside label records an evening of the Guaraldi Trio's Jazz Workshop performances with Ben Webster and Jimmy Witherspoon, for an album eventually released in 1968 and titled Live: Jimmy Witherspoon.

Tracks recorded: "C.C. Rider," "Confessin' the Blues," "Goin' Down Slow," "Money's Getting' Cheaper," "I'm Gonna Move Way on the Outskirts of Town," "Please Send Me Someone to Love," "Roll 'em Pete," "S.K. Blues," "St. Louis Blues," "T'Ain't Nobody's Biz-ness if I Do" and "Trouble in Mind."

[The precise recording date of this album remains unknown. But the participation of Monty Budwig and Colin Bailey, along with this gig's proximity to the Jazz Casual taping, strongly suggests this two-week window in late December/early January.]

Early January

The Verve label also records an evening of the Guaraldi Trio's Jazz Workshop performances with Ben Webster and Jimmy Witherspoon, for an album eventually released in 1973 and titled Jimmy Witherspoon & Ben Webster.

Dean Reilly, bass, fills in for an absent Monty Budwig.

Tracks recorded: "C.C. Rider," "Every Day I Have the Blues," "Goin' Down Slow," "How Long, How Long Blues," "I'll Always Be in Love with You," "Roll 'em Pete," "St. Louis Blues" and "T'Ain't Nobody's Biz-ness if I Do."

[The precise recording date of this album remains unknown. But the participation of Colin Bailey, along with this gig's proximity to the Jazz Casual taping, strongly suggests the same two-week window in late December/early January.]

February

At San Francisco's KQED-TV Channel 9 studio, with Colin Bailey and Monty Budwig, recording Guaraldi's Fantasy album, Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus.

The album is cut in one session, from midnight to 4 a.m., and released a few months later.

Tracks recorded: "Alma-Ville," "Cast Your Fate to the Wind," "A Felicidade" (incorrectly titled "Generique" on the original LP), "Manha de Carnaval," "Moon River," "O Nosso Amor," "Samba de Orpheus" and "Since I Fell for You." Guaraldi wrote "Alma-Ville" and "Cast Your Fate to the Wind."

March 6-18

The Blackhawk, with his trio -- Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- sharing the stage with headliner Carmen McRae.

Early April

Opus One, with his trio -- Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- supporting owner/singer Champ Butler.

April 12

Phelan Hall, University of San Francisco, with Guaraldi's Trio -- Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- sharing the bill with the R&B dance band, The Apollos.

April 18

Fantasy Records releases Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus.

Mid-April-May

The Trident, Sausalito, with Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums.

May 5

San Francisco State University -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- for the second annual. Contemporary Arts Festival. Guaraldi's trio shared the stage with the Larry Vuckovich Quintet, the Mose Allison Trio, and alto saxman Lee Konitz. Clarinetist Vince Cattolica joined Guaraldi's Trio for one set.

Mid- or late May

Monty Budwig leaves the trio, having received an invitation to join Shelly Manne's group, down in Los Angeles.

May 28

The Seventh Annual Pageant of Arts, Walnut Creek, California, billed as Vince Guaraldi's Progressive Jazz Trio.

Monty Budwig may have left by this point, possibly replaced by bassist Tom Beeson. Drummer Colin Bailey stayed on.

June 21-24

The San Francisco Museum of Arts, for the first annual San Francisco Poetry Festival, sharing the bill with numerous poets and musicians, along with eight films, three short plays, a dance troupe, a mime troupe, a comedy act and much more.

Guaraldi's trio played several times during the four-day festival.

His sidemen are Colin Bailey, drums, and either Tom Beeson or Eddie Coleman, bass.

July 10-15

The Carter Barron outdoor theater, Washington D.C. -- with Eddie Coleman, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- sharing the stage with the headlining Kingston Trio and comedian Ronnie Schell.

[Eddie Coleman definitely has joined the trio at this point.]

July 19 (?)

The Washington, D.C., Department of Corrections Youth Center, Lorton Virginia, with Eddie Coleman, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums.

[This was a courtesy gig involving only the trio.]

July 20-?

Continuing the tour -- with Eddie Coleman, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- supporting the Kingston Trio and Ronnie Schell.

Performances are known to have taken place at a hotel in Colorado Springs; and Red Rocks Auditorium, near Denver.

September 10-November 4

The Blackhawk -- with Eddie Coleman, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- sharing the bill with the Ramsey Lewis Trio.

Mid-September

Guaraldi, on his own, drops by a Sherman Clay music store in Oakland, intending to purchase some LPs; he lingers long enough to entertain patrons and employees with an hour-long concert on a handy Steinway.

September 22

The Monterey Jazz Festival, with Eddie Coleman, bass, and Colin Bailey, drums.

The trio does three sets this evening, alternating with other acts. Guaraldi doubles as pianist with the afternoon Festival Orchestra.

September 30

Guitarist Bola Sete returns to the Tudor Room of the Sheraton Palace Hotel, as a soloist.

October 1-?

Still at the Blackhawk, now sharing the bill with the John Handy Quartet.

Early October

Eddie Coleman leaves the trio, and is replaced by bassist Fred Marshall.

Late October

Lounge/exotica orchestra leader Martin Denny releases a single on the Liberty label; the A side offers "The Payoff," while the B side features his cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind."

October 28

All proceeds from this evening's performances at the Blackhawk are donated to the United Bay Area Crusade.

October 29-November 4

Still at the Blackhawk, now sharing the bill with Cal Tjader's Afro-Cuban Jazz Quintet.

November 6-January 12

The Trident, Sausalito, with Fred Marshall, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums.

November 24

UC Berkeley, as a soloist, playing at the annual Cal/Stanford game.

December 1

"Cast Your Fate to the Wind" enters Billboard magazine's charts, "bubbling under the Hot 100" at No. 127.

Martin Denny's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" also enters the Billboard charts, also "bubbling under the Hot 100," but at No. 124. It's the only time Denny's version will chart higher than Guaraldi's.

December 4

Fantasy records this evening's sets at the Trident, to be released as Guaraldi's album In Person. His standard trio -- Fred Marshall, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- is augmented by Eddie Duran, guitar; and Benny Velarde, scratcher (gueiro).

Tracks recorded: "Chora Tua Tristeza (Cry Your Blues Away)," "Forgive Me if I'm Late," "Freeway," "Jitterbug Waltz," "The Love of a Rose," "Misirlou," "On Green Dolphin Street," "Outra Vez" and "Zelao." Guaraldi wrote "Freeway."

December 8

"Cast Your Fate to the Wind" enters Billboard's Hot 100, at No. 94.

Martin Denny's cover of the same song remains "bubbling under the Hot 100," this week at No. 126.

December 15

Martin Denny's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" makes one final appearance on the Billboard chart, still "bubbling under the Hot 100," again at No. 124. It never reaches the Hot 100, and vanishes after this brief flurry.

 

1963

Through January 12

The Trident, Sausalito, with Fred Marshall, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums.

Unspecified

Barnaby Conrad sells El Matador to Walter Pastore, at which point the club's primary music focus shifts from pianists to guitarists.

January 5

"Cast Your Fate to the Wind" reaches No. 70 on Billboard's Hot 100.

January 6

The Fellowship Church, San Francisco -- sidemen unspecified -- for "Jazz in the Sanctuary," with the musicians interpreting "traditional church hymns, religious anthems and the written and spoken word [while trying] to find and speak the religious language of jazz."

[This is an intriguing foreshadowing of Guaraldi's activities, two years later, at San Francisco's Grace Cathedral.]

January 27

Drummer Colin Bailey leaves the trio, to join Victor Feldman's band in Hollywood.

February 2

"Cast Your Fate to the Wind" reaches No. 44 on Billboard's Hot 100.

Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus debuts on Billboard's Top 150 album chart, at No. 130.

February 8

Bear's Lair Cabaret, UC Berkeley, with his trio (sidemen unspecified).

February 21-23

The Berry Patch, Sacramento, with Fred Marshall, bass, and Jerry Granelli, drums.

This gig marks Granelli's debut with the band.

February 23

"Cast Your Fate to the Wind" peaks at No. 22 on Billboard's Hot 100, and thereafter starts to drop.

February 26-March 3

The Blackhawk, as a last-moment fill-in for Miles Davis, who is delayed a week.

[Guaraldi's sidemen aren't mentioned; he probably played with Davis' band.]

March 9

Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus reaches No. 69 on Billboard's Top 150 album chart.

April 3

The Pauley Ballroom, UC Berkeley (sidemen unspecified).

April 6

"Cast Your Fate to the Wind" makes its final appearance on Billboard's Hot 100, at No. 70. All told, the song has charted for 19 weeks.

April 8-14

The It Club, Los Angeles -- with Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- sharing the bill with Phineas Newborn and Frank Butler.

April 16-May 18

The Trident, Sausalito, with Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums.

April 20

Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus reaches No. 28 on Billboard's Top 150 album chart, where it appears to peak; it drops the following week.

April 26

The Redwood Room, San Francisco State University -- with Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli drums -- as a "warm up" for the weekend's third annual Contemporary Arts Festival.

[The band gives three shows, all to standing-room-only crowds.]

April 27

The San Francisco State University Auditorium -- with Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- at the campus' third annual Contemporary Arts Festival. Guaraldi's band shares the afternoon bill with John Handy, Turk Murphy and Mary Stallings.

May 11

Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus rallies, once again reaching No. 28 on Billboard's Top 150 album chart.

May 15

Grammy Awards dinner and ceremony, in the Grand Ballroom of the Beverly Hilton Hotel, Beverly Hills (at least, this was Guaraldi's intention).

[Guaraldi's category -- Original Jazz Composition -- was not among those televised.]

[Although Guaraldi flew to Southern California specifically to attend this event, he neglected to pack his tux and was not allowed to attend the banquet. His winning Grammy Award -- for "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" -- was accepted by Shelly Manne.]

May 18

Thanks to the Grammy Award victory for "Cast Your Fate to the Wind," Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus climbs to a new high on Billboard's Top 150 album chart, at No. 24.

May 19-June 23

The hungry i, with Fred Marshall, bass, and Jerry Granelli, drums.

The trio shares the bill with activist comedian Dick Gregory and singer Margie McCoy.

May 25

The Pauley Ballroom, UC Berkeley (sidemen unspecified).

June

Fantasy Records releases Guaraldi's album In Person.

June 2

ILMU Auditorium, San Francisco -- with Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- for a Civil Rights benefit. Guaraldi' trio opened the show, because they had to leave early for another gig in Walnut Creek [see next entry].

The bill also included the John Handy Quartet, Red Rodney's band, Carmen McRae and the Ahmad Jamal Trio.

June 2

The Walnut Creek Library, Walnut Creek, California, for a late afternoon concert, with Fred Marshall, bass, and Jerry Granelli, drums.

June 8

Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus drops precipitously to No. 150 on Billboard's Top 150 album chart. Everybody assumes the ride is over...

June 15

...but no. Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus rallies again, rising to No. 146 on Billboard's Top 150 album chart. It will continue to rise for the next month.

June 25-September 14

The Trident, Sausalito, with Fred Marshall, bass, and Jerry Granelli, drums.

[Guaraldi's trio was booked through September 21, but he became ill the final week; his combo was replaced by singer/pianist Bob Dorough.]

July 20

Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus hits its final "aftershock peak" on Billboard's Top 150 album chart, at No. 78.

July 28

The Blackhawk closes, leaving San Francisco without one of its seminal jazz clubs.

August

At the Fantasy studios -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- recording the album Vince Guaraldi, Bola Sete and Friends.

Tracks recorded: "The Days of Wine and Roses," "Casaba," "Mambossa," "Moon Rays" and "Star Song." Guaraldi wrote "Casaba" (aka "Jambo's") and "Star Song."

["The first time I ever played with Bola was at my house, the day before we cut the LP," Guaraldi claimed, on the liner notes. "We rehearsed at my house, and the next day went to the studio and cut the album. And nothing came out the way we rehearsed it. It was beautiful!"]

August 2

Bear's Lair Cabaret, UC Berkeley, with his trio (sidemen unspecified).

August 10

Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus makes its final appearance on Billboard's Top 150 album chart, at No. 146. All told, the album has charted for 28 weeks.

Summer

At San Francisco's KQED-TV studio, recording a segment of Ralph Gleason's Jazz Casual with guitarist Bola Sete and the trio: Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums.

The set features "Mambossa," "Outra Vez," "Star Song," "Tango El Bongo" and "Tour de Force." The audio eventually is released on CD in 2001; the full show also is made available on VHS tape and DVD (the latter only in the Region 2 format, however).

[Guaraldi's participation in this session is much less aggressive than usual, because he had injured the middle finger of his left hand; it was in a splint.]

Summer

At the Fantasy studios -- with Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- recording the album The Latin Side of Vince Guaraldi, which is released the following summer. The trio is augmented, on some cuts, by Eddie Duran, guitar; Bill Fitch, congas; Benny Velarde, timbales; and a strong quartet.

Tracks recorded: "Brasilia," "Corcovado (Quiet Nights)," "Dor Que Faz Doer," "Mr. Lucky," "Star Song," "Treat Street," "What Kind of Fool Am I," "Whirlpool" and "Work Song." Guaraldi wrote "Brasilia," "Star Song," "Treat Street" and "Whirlpool."

September 28

Stanford University -- with Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- playing during halftime of the Stanford-Oregon football game, because the Stanford Marching Band is on strike.

September 29

The Oakland Auditorium -- with Fred Marshall, bass, and Jerry Granelli, drums -- for the jazz portion of an event dubbed "Grodin's Music Festival."

The jazz bill also included the Dave Brubeck Quartet, the Four Freshmen, the Brothers Four and other musicians.

October (?)

The Reverend Charles Gompertz, hearing "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" on the radio, contacts Vince Guaraldi and asks him to compose and perform a Jazz Mass, as part of the "Year of Grace" celebrations honoring San Francisco's renovated Grace Cathedral.

October 6

A Man Named Mays, the debut documentary from Lee Mendelson Productions, airs on national television, earning strong ratings against a higher-profile Elizabeth Taylor special. On the basis of this success, Mendelson decides to make a documentary about Charles M. Schulz and Charlie Brown, and contacts Guaraldi.

October 23

Sacramento State University, Sacramento, California -- with Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- for the opening performance of a "one-month string of college campus one-nighters" that featured headliner Dick Gregory and singer Margie McCoy.

October 24

Chico State University, Chico, California, with the Dick Gregory tour.

October 25

Fresno State University, Fresno, California, with the Dick Gregory tour.

October 27

UC Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, with the Dick Gregory tour.

October 28

Awalt High School, Los Altos, California, with the Dick Gregory tour.

October 29

The College of San Mateo, San Mateo, California, with the Dick Gregory tour.

October 31

Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, California, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 1

The San Jose Civic Auditorium, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 3

UC Davis, Davis, California, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 4

Utah State University, Logan, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 6

Arizona State University, Metro Phoenix, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 10

The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 13

The University of Colorado, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 14

Colorado State University, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 15

Denver University, Colorado, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 17

Kansas State College, Pittsburgh, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 18

Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 19

The University of South Dakota, Vermillion, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 20

Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa, with the Dick Gregory tour.

November 21

Western Illinois University, Macomb, with the Dick Gregory tour.

[Additional dates -- November 22 at the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and November 23 at Detroit University, Michigan -- are canceled when President John F. Kennedy is shot. Upon landing in Pittsburgh, all the tour members are greeted by U.S. Secret Service and sent home.]

December 12

Denver, Colorado -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- as part of promoter Irving Granz's "Jazz a la Carte" tour.

The bill included Sonny Stitt, Dizzy Gillespie, Zoot Sims, Al Cohn, the Wynton Kelly Trio, J.J. Johnson, Gerry Mulligan, Joe Newman, Coleman Hawkins and singer Dakota Staton.

December 13

The Masonic Memorial, San Francisco, for the second "Jazz a la Carte" appearance.

December 14

The Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, for the third "Jazz a la Carte" appearance.

December 15

Keil Auditorium, St. Louis, Missouri, for the fourth and final "Jazz a la Carte" appearance.

 

1964

January 5

The Masonic Auditorium, San Francisco -- with Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- for a benefit concert dubbed "Freedom Mississippi: 1964."

The bill includes Dick Gregory, The Committee, the Art Farmer Quartet and others

[Guaraldi's trio waited all afternoon to perform, but the event ran too long, so they played later at the reception.]

January

Fantasy Records releases the LP Vince Guaraldi, Bola Sete and Friends.

February 7

The Men's Gym, San Jose City College, with Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums.

Guaraldi's trio shares the bill with the Cal Tjader Quintet and the Gateway Trio.

[Guaraldi's group plays early, since they're also scheduled to open at Trois Couleurs the same evening.]

February 7-May 31

Trois Couleurs, Berkeley, with Fred Marshall, bass, and Jerry Granelli, drums.

March 2

The Trident, Sausalito, for a "preview party" for Ralph Gleason's film, Anatomy of a Hit.

[There's no indication that Guaraldi performed, either solo or with a combo.]

March 6

Bola Sete permanently joins Guaraldi's combo at Trois Couleurs, beginning an association with Guaraldi that will last two years.

March 7

Riordan High School, San Francisco, where Guaraldi is a special guest at the South San Francisco Unified School District's firth annual Dance Band Tournament.

[There's no indication that Guaraldi performed, either solo or with a combo.]

March 11

San Francisco's KQED-TV Channel 9 begins airing Ralph Gleason's three-part Anatomy of a Hit, with episodes two and three following on March 18 and 25.

[These dates are echoed in Boston, Chicago and New York; all other National Educational Television affiliates begin one month later, with broadcast dates in April.]

Mid-March

Fantasy Records releases the album Jazz Impressions: Vince Guaraldi, a "greatest hits" collection of tracks from the pianist's first two Fantasy albums.

March 15

The San Francisco Museum of Art, without Bola Sete (sidemen unspecified), for an afternoon trio concert. Guaraldi's combo was joined by Sete the same evening, for the usual Trois Couleurs gig.

Spring

At the Fantasy studios -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- recording tracks for what eventually will become the album From All Sides, eventually released in February 1965.

Tracks recorded: "Ballad of Pancho Villa," "Choro," "Little Fishes," "Menino Pequeno da Bateria" and "A Taste of Honey." Guaraldi wrote "Ballad of Pancho Villa," "Choro" and "Menino Pequeno da Bateria."

March 23

International House, UC Berkeley, without Bola Sete (sidemen unspecified), for a variety show sponsored by the Chinese Students Inter-Collegiate Organization.

[Guaraldi's combo followed a talent contest of student singers, dancers and actors.]

March 24

Live appearance on San Francisco KGO-TV Channel 7's The Dick Stewart Show, with Bola Sete (sidemen unspecified).

April

San Francisco magazine runs a cover story on Lee Mendelson's recently announced television documentary, A Boy Named Charlie Brown, with original music to be supplied by Guaraldi.

[Sadly, Mendelson never will be able to market this show; it will remain "lost" until being released on DVD by the Charles M. Schulz Museum, in December 2005.]

April 3

Live appearance on San Francisco KGO-TV Channel 7's The Dick Stewart Show, with Bola Sete (sidemen unspecified).

April 10

Bear's Lair Cabaret, UC Berkeley, with Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums.

Guaraldi's trio did this gig without Bola Sete, who was supported by his own rhythm section at Trois Couleurs that evening.

April (?)

St. Paul's Church, San Rafael

At about this time, Guaraldi begins rehearsing for the upcoming Grace Cathedral Jazz Mass -- on most Saturday mornings -- with the St. Paul Church Choir, alongside choirmaster and organist Barret (Barry) Mineah. These rehearsals continue for a year, Guaraldi participating without sidemen until early 1965.

May 14

Diablo Valley College, Concord, California, with Bola Sete (sidemen unspecified), for a benefit raising funds for the Rumford Housing Law.

The bill also features singers Elmerlee Thomas and Malvina Reynolds.

May 16

The Little Theater, Berkeley High School, with Bola Sete, guitar; Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums.

The Guaraldi/Sete Quartet is joined by the Berkeley High School Band, in a benefit concert for school's 19-piece jazz orchestra.

[Earlier in the afternoon, Lee Mendelson and Charles M. Schulz appear at San Francisco's Candlestick Park, to celebrate "Charlie Brown Day" and film some footage for what Mendelson has decided to call A Boy Named Charlie Brown.]

May 17 (?)

La Val's Pizza Restaurant, Berkeley, as part of the audience enjoying a concert by veteran bassist George Murphy "Pops" Foster.

May 18

Golden Gate Park, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified, and without Bola Sete), for a "Save the Park" rally.

May 23

University of San Francisco Gym, with Bola Sete -- sidemen unspecified -- for a benefit staged by St. Ignatius High School.

The Guaraldi/Sete Quartet shares the bill with the Gateway Trio and Ronnie Schell.

May 31

After a row with Guaraldi, Fred Marshall and Jerry Granelli both quit the band on the final weekend of the Trois Couleurs gig.

June

Fantasy Records releases The Latin Side of Vince Guaraldi.

June 14

Marine's Memorial Building, San Francisco -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- for the first "Sunday Salon" jazz concert.

Late June

Stamford, Connecticut, at the home of clarinetist Benny Goodman, in order to rehearse for an upcoming tour.

July 2

Princeton, New Jersey, on the first stop of the tour with the Benny Goodman Sextet. The band also includes Monty Budwig, bass; Colin Bailey, drums; Theodore Marcus "Teddy" Edwards, tenor sax; and Bobby Hackett, cornet.

July 3

Stamford, Connecticut, touring with the Benny Goodman Sextet.

July 10

Mystic, Connecticut, touring with the Benny Goodman Sextet. The venue is a "fancy yacht club."

July 13-18

The Shoreline Hotel, Washington, D.C., touring with Benny Goodman. Teddy Edwards and Bobby Hackett have dropped out, and the group is now just a quartet: Goodman, clarinet; Guaraldi, piano; Monty Budwig, bass; Colin Bailey, drums.

Early August

The Guaraldi/Sete Quartet is announced as part of the lineup for the seventh annual Monterey Jazz Festival.

August 14-30

The Gold Nugget, Oakland, with Tom Beeson, bass; and John Rae, drums.

August 17

Trois Couleurs is condemned and closes down.

August 27

Foothill Square Shopping Center, Oakland -- with Bola Sete, guitar (sidemen unspecified) -- for a free evening concert.

August 30

The Mountain Theater, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, California -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and John Rae, drums -- for a "Jazz on the Mountain" benefit for the Stinson Beach Arts Foundation.

The bill includes Malvina Reynolds and the John Coppola/Fred Mergy Band.

September 4-6

The Hotel Claremont, Berkeley, with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass, and Paul Distell, drums.

September 14

The Masonic Auditorium, San Francisco -- with Bola Sete, guitar (sidemen unspecified) -- for "Jazz at the Masonic."

The bill includes Bill Cosby, Dizzy Gillespie, Carol Sloane and John Handy and the Freedom Band.

September 15-November 1

El Matador, San Francisco, with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Benny Barth, drums.

September 16

Crown-Zellerbach Plaza, San Francisco -- absent Bola Sete (sidemen unspecified) -- for the "Little World's Fair" benefit for the United Bay Area Crusades.

September 20

The seventh annual Monterey Jazz Festival, with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Benny Barth, drums.

October 3

Live appearance on San Francisco KGO-TV Channel 7's The Dick Stewart Show (no mention of Bola Sete, and sidemen unspecified). Bill Cosby also was on the program.

October 26

Whitney Studio, Glendale, California -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- recording the tracks for A Boy Named Charlie Brown.

Tracks recorded: "Baseball Theme," "Blue Charlie Brown," "Charlie Brown Theme," "Frieda (With the Naturally Curly Hair)," "Happiness Is," "Linus and Lucy," "Oh, Good Grief," "Pebble Beach" and "Schroeder." Guaraldi wrote all the songs.

November 17-December 13

El Matador, San Francisco, with Bola Sete, guitar (sidemen unspecified).

November 21

San Francisco's Grace Cathedral is consecrated.

November 25

Cal State Hayward, California (absent Bola Sete, sidemen unspecified).

Mid-December

Fantasy Records releases the album Jazz Impressions of A Boy Named Charlie Brown.

December 22-January 3

Shelly's Manne-Hole, Hollywood, with Bola Sete, guitar; Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums.

 

1965

Through January 3

Shelly's Manne-Hole, Hollywood, with Bola Sete, guitar; Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums.

Unspecified

At some point during 1965, Jimbo's Bop City closes. Guaraldi and many of his sidemen often played at this after-hours club, which catered to jazz cats from 2 to 6 a.m.

January 8-17

The Hotel Claremont, Berkeley, with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Benny Barth, drums.

Mid-January (?)

At the Fantasy studios -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Monty Budwig, bass; and Nick Martinez, drums -- recording the remaining tracks for From All Sides, released in February.

Tracks recorded: "Ginza," "The Girl from Ipanema" and "Mambeando." Guaraldi wrote "Ginza."

January 19-31

El Matador -- with Bola Sete, guitar (sidemen unspecified) -- filling in for an absent Jose Feliciano, who canceled at the last minute.

January 29

Guaraldi guests at an afternoon gathering of the National Educational Television Group.

[No mention is made as to whether Guaraldi appeared alone, or performed solo or with his trio.]

January 29

The Oakland Auditorium, with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Benny Barth, drums.

Early February

Basin Street West, San Francisco, with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Benny Barth, drums.

During this stint, the quartet is filmed for Ralph Gleason's BBC-TV profile on the series Inside America.

Mid-February

Fantasy Records releases the album From All Sides.

February 19

The planned departure date of a package tour to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with Bola Sete, to celebrate the city's 400th anniversary during the annual Carnival festivities.

The entire trip is canceled at the last moment, due to unknown reasons.

March 6

Whitney Studio, Glendale -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -recording the score for A Charlie Brown Christmas.

March ??

San Mateo College, California, with Bola Sete, guitar (sidemen unspecified).

The bill also includes pianist Ralph Sutton.

March 14

Vancouver, with Bola Sete, guitar (sidemen unspecified).

The bill also includes Gerry Mulligan and the Modern Jazz Quartet.

March 20

The British instrumental group Sounds Orchestral's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" enters the Billboard Hot 100 chart, at No. 79. It also enters Billboard's MOR (middle of the road) Pop Standard Single chart, at No. 19.

March 25

Guaraldi plays "victim" for jazz critic/historian Leonard Feather's regular "Blindfold Test" column in Downbeat magazine.

March 29-April 3

The Showboat Lounge, Washington D.C., with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums.

During this engagement, Guaraldi is known to have performed at least two original compositions -- "My Loneliness" and " 'n the Rail" -- which he'd never get around to recording on an album.

April 6-May 16 (and perhaps longer)

El Matador, with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums.

[The short travelogue film San Francisco, San Francisco, San Francisco -- which includes a brief segment showing Guaraldi and Sete at El Matador -- likely is filmed during this gig.]

Spring

With the Grace Cathedral performance date approaching, Guaraldi begins to bring his sidemen to St. Paul's Church in San Rafael, during rehearsals with the choir.

April or May

Fantasy brings in equipment to record live sets during the Guaraldi/Sete Quartet's appearance at El Matador, resulting in the album Live at El Matador, held back for release until October 1966.

Track listing: "Black Orpheus Suite," "El Matador," "Favela," "I'm a Loser," "More," "Nobody Else" and "People." Guaraldi wrote "El Matador" and "Nobody Else."

April 17

The Circle Star Theater, San Carlos -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums -- sharing the bill with headliner Glenn Yarbrough.

The program also includes Bud & Travis.

[The concert sells out, prompting a second outing a month later.]

April 20 (?)

The Circle Star Theater, San Carlos -- with Bola Sete, guitar (sidemen unspecified) -- sharing the bill with the Kingston Trio and comic Ronnie Schell.

[Despite some advance advertising, this gig may not have taken place.]

May 1

Sounds Orchestral's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" reaches No. 12 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart, and No. 1 on the MOR Pop Standard Single chart. It remains at No. 1 on the latter for three weeks.

May 8

Sounds Orchestral's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" peaks on Billboard's Hot 100 chart, at No. 10 (several notches higher than Guaraldi's own version, back in 1963).

May 10

The Circle Star Theater, San Carlos -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums -- sharing the bill with headliner Glenn Yarbrough.

The program also includes Bud & Travis.

[Repeat of the April 17 event.]

May 16

Notre Dame College Auditorium, Belmont, California -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums -- for "A Capsule of Jazz History," a benefit for the Carlmont chapter of the Children's Home Society.

The bill includes the Jean Hoffman Trio, the John Coppola Orchestra; the event is emceed by Jimmy Lyons.

May 18

Grace Cathedral, San Francisco, for a rehearsal of Guaraldi's Jazz Mass, with Tom Beeson, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums. The rehearsal also includes the St. Paul Church Choir, along with Bishop James Pike and the Reverend David Crump, serving as Celebrant.

May 21

Grace Cathedral, San Francisco, for Guaraldi's Jazz Mass, with Tom Beeson, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums. The service also includes the St. Paul Church Choir, along with Bishop James Pike and the Reverend David Crump, serving as Celebrant.

Fantasy records the entire service; the Reverend Charles Gompertz later helps edit the material down for an album, Vince Guaraldi at Grace Cathedral, released in mid-summer.

May 22

Vocalist Steve Alaimo's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" hovers near the Billboard Hot 100 Chart, "bubbling under" at No. 114.

Mid- to late May

Thanks to his increased financial stature, Guaraldi and his family move from their cramped Daly City residence to a larger home, at 31 Millay Place, in Mill Valley.

May 28-June 6

The Lighthouse, Hermosa Beach, with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums.

May 29

Sounds Orchestral's version of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" drops to No. 15 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart, and makes its final appearance -- at No. 4 -- on the MOR Pop Standard Single chart.

The group's LP of the same title enters Billboard's Top 150 album chart, at No. 135.

Early June

A Southern California recording studio -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Tom Beeson, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums -- taping four sessions of the 15-minute public service radio show, The Navy Swings.

[The exact recording date remains unknown, but -- given the musicians involved -- it probably took place during the Guaraldi/Sete Quartet's stay at The Lighthouse.]

June 5

Steve Alaimo's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" debuts on the Billboard Easy Listening Chart, at No. 38, although it's still "bubbling under" the Hot 100 Pop Chart (at No. 123).

June 12

Sounds Orchestral's version of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" makes its final appearance on Billboard's Hot 100 chart, at No. 36.

The group's LP of the same title reaches No. 50 on Billboard's Top 150 album chart.

June 26

Steve Alaimo's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" debuts on the Billboard Hot 100 Pop Chart, at No. 90; it also remains on the Easy Listening Chart, at No. 27.

July 3

Steve Alaimo's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" peaks on the Billboard Hot 100 Pop Chart, at No. 89, and then vanishes after just two weeks. It also peaks on the Easy Listening Chart, at No. 22.

July 6-18

Shelly's Manne Hole, Hollywood, with Bola Sete, guitar; Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums

July 9

Guaraldi and his trio -- Tom Beeson, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums -- are pictured in a Time magazine article that discusses the Grace Cathedral Jazz Mass.

July 10

Steve Alaimo's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" makes its final appearance on Billboard's Easy Listening Chart, at No. 38. All told, the song has charted for six weeks.

July 17

Sounds Orchestral's Cast Your Fate to the Wind LP peaks on Billboard's Top 150 album chart. It will remain on this chart for the rest of the year, finally dropping to No. 136 on December 4.

July 30-31

Foothill College, Los Altos, California -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Puzzy Firth, bass; and Paul Distel, drums -- for the Festival of the Performing Arts.

The Guaraldi/Sete Quartet is joined by a 125-voice community chorus.

Summer

An "Eastern tour" -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Puzzy Firth, bass; and Paul Distel, drums -- initially billed to include Peoria, Illinois; Detroit (at Baker's Keyboard Lounge), New York, Boston and Philadelphia. Verified gigs are cited in the next few entries.

August 3-8

The Rubiot, South Peoria, Illinois, with Bola Sete, guitar; Puzzy Firth, bass; and Paul Distel, drums.

August 13

Singer Marty Balin and three partners open a San Francisco music club at 3138 Fillmore Street, initially as a venue for his own house band, Jefferson Airplane. Before long, the Matrix will become one of the city's favorite performance spaces for rising rock and blues acts (with the occasional jazz interloper).

August 23 -- September 4

The Showboat Lounge, Washington, D.C., with Bola Sete, guitar; Puzzy Firth, bass; and Paul Distel, drums.

August 29

The Mountain Theater, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, California -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Al Obidinski, bass; and Benny Barth, drums -- for "Jazz on the Mountain II."

The bill includes the Gerry Olds Jazz Band.

[Guaraldi and Sete flew back from D.C. to make this gig, then returned to the Showboat Lounge.]

September

Fantasy Records releases the album Vince Guaraldi at Grace Cathedral.

September (?)

At the Fantasy Studios -- with Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- recording the TV soundtrack for A Charlie Brown Christmas.

At least three evening sessions include young members of the San Rafael Choir.

Tracks recorded: "Christmas Is Coming," "The Christmas Song," "Christmas Time Is Here," "Fur Elise," "Hark, the Herald Angels Sing," "Linus and Lucy," "My Little Drum," "O Tannenbaum," "Skating" and "What Child Is This." Guaraldi wrote "Christmas Is Coming," "Christmas Time Is Here," "Linus and Lucy," "My Little Drum" and "Skating."

September 14

Bay of Gold, a documentary about San Francisco Bay, directed by Lee Mendelson, premieres on San Francisco's KPIX-TV Channel 5. The score, by Guaraldi, includes several new themes and a reprise of "Macedonia," which had debuted on the album Little Band, Big Jazz.

October

Leonard Sheftman and Delanor Dean open the Both/And Club at 350 Divisadero; it soon will become one of San Francisco's last great jazz clubs.

October 4

Cabrillo College Theater, Aptos, California, with Bola Sete, guitar; Puzzy Firth, bass; and Paul Distel, drums.

October 5

West Valley College Auditorium, Saratoga, California, with Bola Sete, guitar; Puzzy Firth, bass; and Paul Distel, drums.

October 9

College of Marin Gym, Kentfield, California, with Bola Sete, guitar; Puzzy Firth, bass; and Paul Distel, drums.

October 19

The Fantasy studios, recording tracks for A Charlie Brown Christmas, with Al Obidinski, bass; and Benny Barth, drums.

[Were any of these recordings used on the LP? Unknown. Four different sets of sidemen -- Monty Budwig and Colin Bailey, Fred Marshall and Jerry Granelli, Al Obidinski and Benny Barth, and Puzzy Girth and Paul Distel -- have claimed credit for part or all of this album, over the years. Guaraldi was notoriously lax about keeping good records; Fantasy was no better. To this day, the subject remains mired in controversy.]

October 28

St. Mary's College, Moraga, California, with Bola Sete, guitar (sidemen unspecified).

[At least one review claims the sidemen were Monty Budwig and Colin Bailey; this is false.]

November

St. Paul's Church, San Rafael, with the church's children's choir (sidemen unspecified).

November 30-December 19

El Matador, San Francisco, with Bola Sete, guitar (sidemen unspecified).

December 4

Fantasy Records releases the album soundtrack to A Charlie Brown Christmas.

December 4

Sounds Orchestral's Cast Your Fate to the Wind LP makes its final appearance on Billboard's Top 150 album chart, at No. 136. All told, the album has charted for 38 weeks ... far longer than Guaraldi's Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus.

December 9

A Charlie Brown Christmas debuts on CBS-TV.

December 22-January 16

El Matador, San Francisco, with Bola Sete, guitar; Puzzy Firth, bass; and Paul Distel, drums.

 

1966

Through January 16

El Matador, San Francisco, with Bola Sete, guitar; Puzzy Firth, bass; and Paul Distel, drums.

January 1

San Quentin -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Puzzy Firth, bass; and Paul Distel, drums -- as part of the ambitious bill for the prison's annual Show of Stars.

January 8

Creative Arts Auditorium, Pittsburgh, California -- with Bola Sete, guitar; Puzzy Firth, bass; and Paul Distel, drums -- for the Contra Costa Concert Guild's "Concert in Jazz."

The event is hosted by Ralph Gleason.

January 17

The 100 Club, Sheraton-Palace Hotel, San Francisco, as "Les Divertissments" (no mention of Bola Sete or sidemen).

January 23

The Church in Ignacio, Marin County, California -- with Puzzy Firth, bass; and Paul Distel, drums -- for a reprise of the Grace Cathedral Mass.

San Francisco's KPIX-TV Channel 5 films the entire service, portions of which appear in the public affairs show In the Marketplace, eventually aired September 6.

February 7

Bola Sete concludes his performance relationship with Guaraldi, and -- after a brief vacation -- forms his own band.

[As of March, Sete is fronting a trio at the Trident, accompanied by Sebastian Neto, bass; and Paulinho, drums.]

February 19

San Quentin Prison (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with Eartha Kitt, Dick Contino, George McKelvey and others.

February 26

Claremont Men's College, California (sidemen unspecified), sharing the stage with Roger Miller, for the college's 15th annual spring concert.

February 27

Live TV appearance on San Francisco KPIX-TV's Pow!, hosted by Rolfe Peterson (no mention of sidemen).

March 8

At a San Francisco-area recording studio (unspecified) -- with Eddie Duran, guitar; Puzzy Firth, bass; and Pete Magadini, drums -- taping an original score for the industrial film An Adventure with Spice Islands, directed by Lee Mendelson.

April 11-May 16

El Matador, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

April 14

San Francisco-area newspapers report that Guaraldi has sued Fantasy Records, in an effort to sever all relationships with the label. Fantasy promptly countersues Guaraldi.

April 20

Lee Mendelson flies to New York, to accept the prestigious Peabody Award for A Charlie Brown Christmas.

May 8

Frost Amphitheater, Stanford (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with headliner Glenn Yarbrough, in a benefit for the Stanford Children's Convalescent Hospital.

May 20-21

Portland State College, Oregon (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with Miles Davis, for the campus' second annual Jazz Festival.

May 22

Hollywood, California, as A Charlie Brown Christmas wins an Emmy Award for Outstanding Children's Program.

May 24-?

Nero's Nook at The Cabana, Palo Alto -- with Tom Beeson, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums -- sharing the stage with Jorge Morel.

June 8

Charlie Brown's All-Stars debuts on CBS-TV.

June 12

Live TV appearance on San Francisco KPIX-TV's Pow! at 1:30 p.m. (sidemen unspecified), hosted by Rolfe Peterson.

The show's guest list also includes Anna Leaf.

August 7

Sigmund Stern Recreation Grove, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), for the first annual "Jazz in Stern Grove Music Festival."

The bill includes the John Handy Quintet, and the Turk Murphy and Rudy Salvini bands. Jimmy Lyons and Al "Jazzbo" Collins serve as hosts.

["They were hanging from the trees!" Guaraldi later recalled.]

August 13

California-born singer Shelby Flint's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" enters the Billboard Top 100 chart, at No. 94.

[Flint's only other Top 100 hit was 1961's "Angel on My Shoulder."]

August 20

Shelby Flint's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" climbs to No. 79 on Billboard's Top 100 chart, and enters the Top 40 Easy Listening chart, at No. 34.

Late August

At a San Francisco-area recording studio (unspecified) -- with Puzzy Firth, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums -- taping an original score for a Pacific Bell TV commercial, produced and directed by Lee Mendelson.

Late August

At a San Francisco-area recording studio (unspecified) -- with Eddie Duran, guitar; Fred Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- taping an original score for a Granny Goose TV commercial, produced and directed by Lee Mendelson.

September 6

TV broadcast of the KPIX Channel 5 public affairs show, In the Marketplace, which includes portions of the Grace Cathedral Mass performed at the Church of Ignacio in January.

September 12-October 9

Malcolm Boyd appears at San Francisco's hungry i for a month, following Dick Gregory on the bill and "performing" his prayer/poems to musical accompaniment.

Boyd's regular accompanist, guitarist Charlie Byrd, can't make the first week because of a conflicting gig at El Matador; Guaraldi steps in -- perhaps once, perhaps for the entire week -- to provide piano accompaniment instead.

September 17

In the audience at the Monterey Jazz Festival, when Bola Sete's combo receives a standing ovation.

Shelby Flint's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" peaks on Billboard's Top 100 chart, at No. 61 ... and then vanishes. All told, it has charted (on this list) for six weeks.

September 24

Shelby Flint's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" peaks on Billboard's Top 40 Easy Listening chart, at No. 11.

Late September

The Jazz Workshop, Boston, with Kelly Bryan, bass; and John Rae, drums.

This booking is known to have run two weeks.

October

Fantasy Records releases the LP Live at El Matador, the final Guaraldi album on its label.

October 4

Shelby Flint's cover of "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" makes its final appearance on Billboard's Top 40 Easy Listening chart, at No. 24. All told, it has charted (on this list) for seven weeks.

October 4

Desilu Studios, Hollywood, recording the score for It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown. The band includes Monty Budwig, bass; John Gray, guitar; Emanuel Klein, trumpet; Ronald Lang, woodwinds; and Colin Bailey, drums.

October 7

Orange County Fairgrounds, California -- with Kelly Bryan, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums -- for the first Pacific Jazz Festival.

The bill includes the Cal Tjader Quintet, Jimmy Rushing, Jefferson Airplane (!), Don Ellis, Stan Kenton, Bola Sete, Ornette Coleman's Big Band and all sorts of other folks.

October 14

Bear's Lair, UC Berkeley, with Kelly Bryan, bass; and John Rae, drums

Mid-October

Fantasy Records releases the album Live at El Matador.

October 27

It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV.

November 10

St. Francis College, Loretto, Pennsylvania -- with Kelly Bryan, bass; and John Rae, drums -- as part of the College Culture Series Program.

November 12

University of Iowa Memorial Union, Iowa City, Iowa -- with Kelly Bryan, bass; and John Rae, drums -- as the opening act for headliner Allan Sherman.

Bryan and Rae actually pulled double duty at this gig.

"John and I also had to accompany Sherman's act," Bryan recalls, "along with his music director and pianist, Billy Goldenberg. I remember rehearsing in Sherman's hotel room. Sherman was sitting on his double bed in his underwear, directing us, and I was thinking, 'Is this the real show biz, now?' "

December 13

Tamalpais High School, in the audience with Charles Gompertz, watching young pianist Brian Mann perform the Grace Cathedral Jazz Mass.

December 16

In his San Francisco Chronicle column, Ralph Gleason reports that Fantasy Records is being sold. (Guaraldi's lawsuit has yet to be resolved.)

 

1967

February 4 and 11

The Trident, Sausalito (sidemen unspecified), to replace Bola Sete during his ongoing run; on these Saturdays Sete is performing with Nancy Wilson.

February 12

State University College of Potsdam, Syracuse, New York -- with Kelly Bryan, bass; and John Rae, drums -- for a concert that concludes the 37th annual Ice Carnival.

The bill includes Dick Gregory.

Late February-Early March

The Hotel Jerome, Aspen, Colorado, subbing for pianist Flip Nunez; the sidemen are Paul Warburton, bass; and Al Coster, drums.

March 7

At the Sound Recorders Studio ) -- with Eddie Duran, guitar; Roland Haynes, bass; and John Rae, drums -- taping an original score for the industrial film '67 West, directed by Lee Mendelson.

The score includes the compositions "Pebble Beach" and "Newport Theme," both (eventually) released on different albums.

March 10

San Diego, California (location unspecified) -- with Roland Haynes, bass; and John Rae, drums -- sharing the bill with headliner Dionne Warwick.

Mid-March

The Hotel Jerome, Aspen, Colorado, with Paul Warburton, bass; and Al Coster, drums.

April 11-May 7

The Trident, Sausalito, with Kelly Bryan, bass; and John Rae, drums.

During this engagement, Guaraldi is known to have performed at least one original composition -- "Swan Sung Blue" -- which he'd never get around to recording on an album.

April 19

The Bohemian Club, San Francisco, as solo pianist during a KQED-TV Channel 9 fund drive. Guaraldi played for the cocktail reception that preceded the dinner.

April 23

Live TV appearance on San Francisco KPIX-TV's Pow! at 1 p.m. (sidemen unspecified), with sidemen Kelly Bryan, bass; and John Rae, drums.

The show's guest list also includes the Goodtime Washboard Three.

Late April or early May

Stanford Chapel, California (sidemen unspecified), joining Chuck Gompertz for another performance of the Grace Cathedral Mass.

May 6

Variety publishes a special "Spotlight on San Francisco" section, which includes several pages devoted to the city's jazz scene. Guaraldi takes advantage of this to promote his new business: D and D Associates, named for his children, David and Dia.

May 8-15

Shelly's Manne-Hole, Hollywood, with Kelly Bryan, bass; and John Rae, drums.

May 17

United Recorders, Hollywood, recording the score for You're in Love, Charlie Brown. Guaraldi joined by Frank Rosolino, trombone; John Gray, guitar; Monty Budwig, bass; Ronald Lang, woodwinds; and John Rae, drums.

May 21

Santa Clara University's North Lawn, California (sidemen unspecified), as a benefit for the new Alviso Medical Clinic.

The bill includes the Cal Tjader Quintet and Jefferson Airplane.

May 25

Pauly Ballroom, UC Berkeley, with Kelly Bryan, bass; and John Rae, drums.

The bill includes the Lockheed Pipers.

June 2

The Gilded Cage, San Francisco, with Kelly Bryan, bass; and John Rae, drums.

June 12

You're in Love, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV.

July 23

Sigmund Stern Recreation Grove, San Francisco -- Kelly Bryan, acoustic bass; and Vince Lateano, drums -- for the second annual "Jazz in Stern Grove Music Festival."

Guaraldi's band is joined by the 58-members San Francisco Boys Chorus; the bill also includes Turk Murphy's Jazz Band, The Only Alternative, and John Coppola and the Friends of Bebop.

August 19

Mount Tamalpais Amphitheater, Marin County, California (sidemen unspecified).

The bill includes Count Basie and Jon Hendricks.

August 22-September 16

C'est Bon, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

Late summer/early autumn

During the course of several different recording sessions, with different personnel, Guaraldi oversees the production of his album Vince Guaraldi with the San Francisco Boys Chorus, released in December of the same year. He's joined, at varying times, by Eddie Duran, guitar; Tom Beeson, Kelly Bryan and Roland Haynes, bass; and Lee Charlton and John Rae, drums.

Tracks recorded: "Blowin' in the Wind," "Eleanor Rigby," "Monterey," "My Little Drum," "Newport Theme," "Spice Island Theme," "Theme to Grace" and "Think Drink." Guaraldi wrote "Monterey," "My Little Drum," "Newport Theme," "Spice Island Theme" and "Theme to Grace."

September 25

Max and Soul Weiss complete their sale of Fantasy Records to Saul Zaentz.

[Guaraldi's lawsuit against the label remains unresolved.]

October 6

Orange County Fairgrounds, California (sidemen unspecified), for the second Pacific Jazz Festival.

The bill includes the Modern Jazz Quartet, Don Ellis, the Four Freshmen, the Bola Set Trio, the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Band and many others.

October 12

The hungry i closes the doors of its "Jackson Street cellar headquarters" for the final time. (Although the club re-opens October 22 in a ritzy new Ghirardelli Square location, it doesn't survive there long. The Jackson Street location is razed to become a parking lot, and club owner Enrico Banducci soon sells the name to a strip joint.)

October 17-29

Old Town Theatre, Los Gatos, California, with Eddie Duran, guitar; Al Coster, drums; and Andy Acosta, bass.

October 19

Steninger Gym, UC San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

October 20

Chabot College Community Auditorium, Hayward, California (sidemen unspecified).

The bill includes jazz lyricist/singer Jon Hendricks.

October 28-29

Peacock Country Club, McNear's Beach, San Rafael, California, with Kelly Bryan, bass, and Al Coster, drums.

This "Rock Jazz Art" festival also features Big Brother and the Holding Company, the Youngbloods, Sopwith Camel, The Cycle, Tom and Lee (on the 29th only), the Chris Ibanez Trio and the George Duke Trio, from noon until dark.

October 30

The Straight Theater, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), for a benefit for radio station KPFA.

The program includes Richie Havens, the Flamin' Groovies, Jon Hendricks, The Charlatans, and Congress of Wonders.

November 10

Kaiser Center's Garden Room, Oakland (sidemen unspecified), for a concert sponsored by St. Mary's College.

November 14-25

C'est Bon, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

December 15

Masonic Auditorium, San Francisco, with Eddie Duran, electric guitar; Kelly Bryan, bass; and Paul Distel, drums. The quartet is joined by the San Francisco Boys Chorus, in a benefit for that ensemble.

Mid-December

Guaraldi releases the LP Vince Guaraldi with the San Francisco Boys Chorus, the only album put out on his own D&D label.

December 17

Las Lomas High School, Walnut Creek, California, with Kelly Bryan, bass, and Paul Distel, drums. The trio is joined by the San Francisco Boys Chorus, for a concert in Walnut Creek's 1967-68 Art Forum Series.

December 27

San Francisco's Superior Court accepts a submission to dismiss the twin lawsuits between Guaraldi and Fantasy Records, leaving Guaraldi a free agent.

 

1968

Early January

Bear Valley Ski Resort, California, with Tom Beeson, bass; and Lee Charlton, drums.

Guaraldi's trio helped open the resort, joined by DJ Al "Jazzbo" Collins.

January 11

United Recorders Studio, Hollywood, recording the original score for He's Your Dog, Charlie Brown. Guaraldi is joined by John Gray, guitar; Frank Strozier, alto sax; Ralph Pena, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums.

January 20-21

The Colony Club, Monterey (sidemen unspecified).

January 21

The Berkeley Community Theater, California (sidemen unspecified).

The bill includes South African singer Miriam Makeba and comic Murray Roman.

Late January/early February

Bear Valley Ski Resort, California, with Kelly Bryan, bass; and John Rae, drums.

February 14

He's Your Dog, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV.

February 19

The Hall of Flowers, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), as part of the Camara Concert Series. The band is billed as The Vince Guaraldi Group.

March 7-9

El Matador, with Kelly Bryan, bass; Bob Addison, electric guitar; and Bobby Natenson, drums.

March 20

Dominic's Restaurant, South San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), at a benefit to re-elect Supervisor Tom Storer.

March 22

Golden State Recorders, San Francisco, laying down the tracks for Guaraldi's debut Warner Bros. LP, Oh, Good Grief. He's joined by Eddie Duran, electric guitar; Stanley Gilbert, bass; and Carl Burnett, drums.

Tracks recorded: "Great Pumpkin Waltz," "It's Your Dog, Charlie Brown," "Linus and Lucy," "Oh, Good Grief," "Peppermint Patty," "Rain, Rain, Go Away," "Red Baron" and "You're in Love, Charlie Brown." Guaraldi wrote all selections.

Late March-late May

A college tour with Guaraldi's new trio -- Bob Maize, bass; and Fritz Kasten, drums -- that includes known stops at the University of the Pacific, in Stockton; and the tour's final stop, at Monterey Peninsula College.

May 18

Guaraldi sprains a finger while disembarking from a plane, forcing him to cancel a second Camera Concert Series performance at San Francisco's Hall of Flowers (May 20) and a three-week gig at the Trident (May 21-June 9).

Late May

Warner Bros. releases the album Oh, Good Grief.

June 2

The College of Marin gym, Marin, California (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with the Cal Tjader Quintet.

Late June (?)

The St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), at the Navy's Midshipmen's Ball, for visiting members of the United States First Fleet.

July 2

Variety announces that Guaraldi has been signed to score the first big-screen Peanuts film, A Boy Named Charlie Brown (not to be confused with the earlier TV documentary of the same title).

July 4-6

Bear Valley Ski Resort, California (sidemen unspecified).

July 9-21

The Trident, Sausalito (sidemen unspecified).

July 29-August 4

El Matador, San Francisco, with Jimmy Stewart, electric guitar; Bob Maize, electric bass; and Bobby Natenson, drums. The group is dubbed Vince Guaraldi's Electric Umbrella Quartet.

August 11

Guaraldi's combo is announced as part of the roster at the upcoming Monterey Jazz Festival.

August 12-18

El Matador, San Francisco, with the Electric Umbrella Quartet: Jimmy Stewart, electric guitar; Bob Maize, electric bass; and Bobby Natenson, drums.

[Guaraldi's split gigs are interrupted by the club's previously scheduled weeklong visit from Mongo Santamaria.]

August 18

Sigmund Stern Recreation Grove, San Francisco -- with the Electric Umbrella Quartet: Jimmy Stewart, electric guitar; Bob Maize, electric bass; and Bob Dominguez, drums -- for the third annual "Jazz in Stern Grove Music Festival."

The bill includes the John Handy Concert Ensemble.

September 21

The 11th annual Monterey Jazz Festival, with Bob Addison, guitar; Bob Maize, electric bass; and Bobby Natenson, drums.

Guaraldi's set is filmed by Lee Mendelson, for use in an upcoming project.

September 26

Freeborn Hall, UC Davis, California, with Bob Addison, guitar; Bob Maize, electric bass; and Bobby Natenson, drums.

October 4

El Matador, having been closed for a complete renovation, re-opens with a booking by Cal Tjader's new combo. The club promises to bring Guaraldi back soon (and does).

October 12

The original hungry i closes, with its Ghirardelli Square replacement opening on October 22.

[Guaraldi is not known to have performed at this new location, which catered mostly to rock acts. It would last only two years, closing in 1970.]

Autumn and winter

Guaraldi spends all kinds of time in the studio, with numerous sets of sidemen, recording the tracks for his second Warner Bros. album, The Eclectic Vince Guaraldi. The personnel include Eddie Duran and Robert Addison, electric guitar; Peter Marshall, bass; Bob Maize and Jim McCabe, electric bass; and Jerry Granelli and Al Coster, drums. It's not know who performed on what.

Tracks recorded: "The Beat Goes On," "Black Sheep Boy," "Coffee and Doe-Nuts," "It Was a Very Good Year," "Lucifer's Lady," "Nobody Else," "Once I Loved," "Reason to Believe" and "Yesterday." Guaraldi wrote "Coffee and Doe-Nuts," "Lucifer's Lady" and "Nobody Else."

October 21-November 14

El Matador, San Francisco, with Bobby Addison, guitar; and an unspecified bassist and drummer.

December 14

The Thunderbolt Hotel ballroom, Millbrae, California (sidemen unspecified.)

Guaraldi's combo shared billing with Cal Tjader.

December 21

Oakland Auditorium (sidemen unspecified), following a basketball game between the upstart American Basketball Association's Oakland Oaks and New Orleans Buccaneers.

Guaraldi's combo shared billing with Cal Tjader and Stan Wilson.

December 31

Winterland, San Francisco. Could this have been when Guaraldi jammed onstage with the Grateful Dead?

This ambitious, all-night New Year's Eve bash featured the Dead, Santana, It's a Beautiful Day and Quicksilver Messenger Service. Guaraldi's girlfriend, Gretchen, would have been present as a representative of concert promoter Bill Graham's Millard Agency. Guaraldi likely would have been at her side ... but would he have joined the Dead onstage, at some point during the night? Grateful Dead historian Corey Arnold believes so; check out his lengthy discussion here.

We await proof...

 

1969

January 7-19

The Exit-In, Palo Alto (sidemen unspecified).

January 24-25

The Colony Club, Monterey (sidemen unspecified).

March 7

Bear's Lair Cabaret, UC Berkeley, with his trio (sidemen unspecified).

Mid-March

Warner Bros. releases the album The Eclectic Vince Guaraldi.

March 14-15

The Matrix, San Francisco as a quartet (sidemen unspecified).

April 11

Mission Church, University of Santa Clara (sidemen unspecified), for a performance of the Grace Cathedral Jazz Mass with the 60-member Santa Clara University Choir.

April 19

Coast Recorders, San Francisco -- with Peter Marshall, bass; and Jerry Granelli, drums -- laying down tracks for the big-screen film A Boy Named Charlie Brown.

April 21-?

El Matador, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

April 23

Chabot College Auditorium, Hayward, California (sidemen unspecified), for the "Maid of San Lorenzo Pageant."

April 28

Santa Rosa, California -- with Peter Marshall, bass; and Bob Belanski, drums -- for the opening of Charles Schulz's Redwood Empire Ice Arena.

Guaraldi's trio shared the stage with emcee Joe Garagiola, the San Francisco cast of the stage play You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown and numerous skating celebrities.

May 16

Los Gatos High School, California -- with Peter Marshall, bass; and Bob Belanski, drums -- for "The Classics and All That Jazz," along with the Amici Della Musica orchestra.

The program features the world premiere of The Charlie Brown Suite.

May 17

Burke School, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), to benefit a Haight-Ashbury medical clinic.

The program also features the Cleveland Wrecking Company, the Richmond Blues Band and numerous other acts.

May 18

Mr. D's, San Francisco's North Beach -- with Peter Marshall, bass; and Bob Belanski, drums -- for "The Classics and All That Jazz," along with the Amici Della Musica orchestra.

The event, a benefit for Amici Della Musica, (mostly) repeats the May 16 Los Gatos gig.

May 24

Charlie Brown and Charles Schulz debuts on CBS-TV.

Lee Mendelson made this "new" documentary by re-purposing material from the never-aired A Boy Named Charlie Brown and adding new scenes, including the footage of Guaraldi's combo shot at the 1968 Monterey Jazz Festival.

May 29

Golden State Recorders, San Francisco -- with Eddie Duran, guitar; Peter Marshall, bass; and Bob Belanski, drums -- working on tracks for an upcoming Warner Bros. album.

As it happens, the two songs recorded -- "Oh Happy Day" and a Guaraldi original titled "The Sharecropper's Daughter" -- never make it onto an album.

June 6-7

The Matrix, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

June 26-28

The Matrix, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

July 23

The San Francisco Civic Auditorium, with comic songwriter Allan Sherman and Arthur Fiedler and the San Francisco Pops.

Sherman's "Peter & the Commissar" requires the participation of a jazz quintet; Guaraldi gathers a combo that includes drummer Al Coster and three other unspecified sidemen.

August 9

Downtown San Francisco -- three vacant lots at Market and 7th streets -- for a Synanon Fair, sharing the bill with Marvin Gardens, Freedom Highway, Esther Phillips and numerous other acts. (Guaraldi's sidemen aren't identified.)

August 14

Western Recorders, Hollywood, recording tracks for the big-screen film A Boy Named Charlie Brown.

The ambitious band includes Monty Budwig, bass; Conte Candoli, trumpet; Milton Bernhart, trombone; Herb Ellis, guitar; Victor Feldman, percussion; and Jack Sperling, drums. As also has become customary with the scoring sessions for the Peanuts TV specials, this session is supervised by John Scott Trotter.

August 22-24

Golden Gate Park, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), for the "Wild West Festival."

The program features 150 (!) groups and individuals from the genres of rock, folk, jazz and classical, ranging from Carlos Santana and the Grateful Dead to the San Francisco Symphony.

August 27

Concord Boulevard Park, Concord (sidemen unspecified), for a Summer Festival concert.

The program includes Amici Della Musica and The Romeros.

September

According to rock legend, songwriter Nick Gravenites wanders into a no-account San Francisco strip club dubbed Keystone Korner, at 750 Vallejo Street, and persuades owner Freddie Herrara to start booking rock acts. The Mike Bloomfield Band takes up residency on September 19 and remains for the better part of a year, by which time the reinvigorated club has become famous. It will transform again in July 1972, when new owner Todd Barkan turns it into a jazz club.

September 11

Western Recorders, Hollywood, scoring the TV special It Was a Short Summer, Charlie Brown. The band includes Monty Budwig, bass; Conte and Pete Candoli, trumpets; Frank Rosolino, trombone; Herb Ellis, guitar; Victor Feldman, percussion; and Jack Sperling, drums.

September 27

It Was a Short Summer, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV.

October 10

Amigo Studios, Los Angeles -- with Monty Budwig, bass; and Colin Bailey, drums -- working on the Warner Bros. album Alma-Ville.

Tracks recorded: "Alma-Ville," "Detained in San Ysidro" and "Jambo's," all written by Guaraldi.

October 14

Western Recorders, Hollywood, recording tracks for the big-screen film A Boy Named Charlie Brown.

This session involves a full-blown orchestra, with support from jazzmen Guaraldi, Monty Budwig, bass; Pete Candoli, trumpet; Herb Ellis, guitar; and Jack Sperling, drums.

Late Autumn/Early Winter

Guaraldi books several more studio sessions, working with various combos, in order to complete his album Alma-Ville.

Tracks recorded: "Cristo Redentor," "Eleanor Rigby," "The Masked Marvel," "Rio from the Air," "Uno Y Uno" and "Watch What Happens." Guaraldi wrote "The Masked Marvel," "Rio from the Air" and "Uno Y Uno."

November 21-22

The Lion's Share, San Anselmo (sidemen unspecified).

December 4

A Boy Named Charlie Brown premiers at New York's Radio City Music Hall.

 

1970

January 8-11

The Matrix, San Francisco, as a trio (sidemen unspecified).

January 28

The Plantation, Ghirardelli Square, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), for "The Age of Analysis," a fundraiser involving astrologists, numerologists and "various other psychics."

Early February (for two weeks)

The Four Seasons, Aspen, Colorado, with Koji Kataoka, bass; and Jimmy Peluso, drums.

February 20-21

The Matrix, San Francisco, with Vince Denham, sax and flute; Koji Kataoka, bass; and Mike Clark, drums.

Late February/Early March

Warner Bros. releases the album Alma-Ville.

Early March

At San Francisco's KRON-TV Channel 4 studio (sidemen unspecified), to tape an episode of the public affairs program Like It Is, accompanied by the Rev. Charles Gompertz.

March 14

San Francisco's KRON-TV airs Guaraldi's episode of Like It Is.

March 18

A Boy Named Charlie Brown finally opens in the greater San Francisco area.

March 22

Los Angeles County Museum (sidemen unspecified), for a jazz festival concert broadcast live on KBCA 105.1 FM.

The program includes Bola Sete, Stanley Turrentine and B.B. King.

April 17-18

The Matrix, San Francisco, with Vince Denham, sax and flute; Koji Kataoka, bass; and Mike Clark, drums.

May 16

Abraham Lincoln High School, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with Terry Dolan and Dan Hicks and his Hot Licks.

A second concert took place on this same day, with the same roster, at San Francisco's A.P. Giannini Junior High School.

June 12-13

The Matrix, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with The Rhythm Dukes.

June 22

The Matrix, San Francisco, jamming with an impressive combo that included Jerry Garcia, Bill Champlin, Curly Cooke, Vince Denham, John Kahn and Bill Vitt.

[This was one of the many Monday evening drop-in jam sessions that took place at the Matrix during this period. Guaraldi wouldn't have been booked; the only name on the bill likely would have been Garcia's.]

Early Summer

Aspen, Colorado (venue and sidemen unspecified)

July (?)

The second annual Robert Mondavi Winery Summer Music Festival, Oakville, California, as a trio (sidemen unspecified). (The precise date remains unknown, although the event likely was a Sunday afternoon in July.)

July 21-August 8

El Matador, San Francisco, with Koji Kataoka, electric bass; and Frank Lagioia, drums.

August 7-8

Scheduled at New Orleans House, Berkeley, but replaced by Mendelbaum and Redwing when the El Matador booking is extended for a third week.

September 18-19

Scheduled at New Orleans House, Berkeley, but replaced by Mendelbaum and The Fourth Way.

September 21

The Matrix, San Francisco, with Vince Denham, sax and flute; Koji Kataoka, bass, and Mike Clark, drums.

September 28

The Matrix, San Francisco, billed as "Vince Guaraldi and Friends," with Vince Denham, sax and flute; Koji Kataoka, bass, and Mike Clark, drums.

October 9-11

The Matrix, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

October 16-18

Mandrake's, Berkeley, with Vince Denham, sax and flute; Koji Kataoka, bass; and Mike Clark, drums.

Guaraldi's quartet is billed opposite Ornette Coleman.

October 27-28

Keystone Korner, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with The Loading Zone.

November 7

The Matrix, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

November 9-18

El Matador, as a quartet (sidemen unspecified), rotating with Cal Tjader's Quintet.

November 13-15 (?)

The Lion's Share, San Anselmo (sidemen unspecified).

November 21

Sonoma State College, Rohnert Park, as a quartet (sidemen unspecified), at the first annual Redwood Empire Stage Band Festival.

November 26

Family Dog at the Great Highway, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), for the 350th Mayflower Reunion Festival, sharing the bill with Dan Hicks and His Hot Licks.

December 4-5

New Orleans House, Berkeley (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with Sunset.

December 11

Mission Church, Santa Clara University, California -- with Peter Marshall, bass; and Mike Clark, drums -sharing the bill with the 115-voice Santa Clara Chorale.

This concert marks the world premiere of Lynn Shurtleff's "Sing Unto the Lord a New Song," written for Guaraldi.

December 12

Grace Cathedral, San Francisco -- with Peter Marshall, bass; and Mike Clark, drums -sharing the bill with the 115-voice Santa Clara Chorale.

A repeat of the previous evening's program in Santa Clara.

[This marks Guaraldi's first performance at Grace Cathedral since the 1965 Jazz Mass.]

Late December

The Jazz Workshop, another of San Francisco's venerable jazz clubs, closes.

December 26

The Matrix, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified)

 

1971

January 16

The Matrix (sidemen unspecified)

Winter

In unspecified studios (sidemen also unspecified), recording the score for the TV special Play It Again, Charlie Brown.

February 11

Mandrake's, Berkeley (sidemen unspecified).

February 22

Guaraldi, Rod McKuen and their fellow musicians from the big-screen film A Boy Named Charlie Brown share an Academy Award nomination in one of the music categories.

February 24

Memorial Church, Stanford University (sidemen unspecified), with the Santa Clara Chorale, for an Ash Wednesday presentation of the Grace Cathedral Jazz Mass.

March 5

Booked as solo pianist at the Coe College Auditorium, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, for a concert titled "The Classics and All That Jazz."

Guaraldi, scheduled to perform his Charlie Brown Suite, becomes ill and cancels; the event is postponed to April 16-17.

March 28

Play it Again, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV.

April 15

The Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles, for the annual Academy Awards ceremony.

April 16-17

Scheduled to perform as solo pianist at the Washington High School Auditorium, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, for a concert titled "The Classics and All That Jazz."

Guaraldi, once again a last-minute no-show, is replaced by pianist Lynn Shurtleff.

April 23-24

The Matrix, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

May 6

The Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, as a quartet (sidemen unspecified) to celebrate and perform at baseball legend Willie Mays' 40th birthday party.

May 23

After gaining fame as Ground Zero in the San Francisco music scene, the Matrix closes its doors.

(But not for the last time. On August 24, 1973, the "new" Matrix opened at 412 Broadway, formerly the site of Mr. D's. Alas, this revived Matrix didn't even survive until the end of that year.)

June 7

Mark Teel's Club Francisco, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), for the club's monthly jam session.

June 18-19

In Your Ear, Palo Alto (sidemen unspecified).

[This venue had been known as the Poppycock from 1967 to '71.]

July 4

Fillmore West, San Francisco, for the final night of the "Live at Fillmore Closing Week," as part of the San Francisco Musicians Jam. Guaraldi played electronic organ during the all-night extravaganza that heralded Fillmore West's closing.

July 20-31

El Matador, San Francisco, with Vince Denham, sax and flute; Seward McCain, electric bass; and John Waller, drums.

During this engagement, Guaraldi is known to have introduced an original composition titled "Oaxaca," which he'd never get around to placing on an album during his lifetime. Happily, the song would be resurrected for a CD many decades later.

August 8

Concord's third annual Summer Festival (sidemen unspecified), sharing the stage with the Cal Tjader Quintet and the Count Basie Orchestra.

October 21-24

In Your Ear, Palo Alto (sidemen unspecified).

[A young George Winston met Guaraldi while playing intermission piano on one of these dates, probably October 24.]

November 30-December 11

El Matador, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

December 14

In Your Ear, Palo Alto (sidemen unspecified).

[George Winston once again played intermission piano on this date, between Guaraldi's sets.]

December 24, 26 and 28

In Your Ear, Palo Alto (sidemen unspecified).

 

1972

January 4, 11 and 18

In Your Ear, Palo Alto (sidemen unspecified).

February 8, 15 and 22

In Your Ear, Palo Alto (sidemen unspecified).

[A young Robben Ford is known to have jammed with Guaraldi's combo during some of his gigs in this club, likely one or more of these dates in February 1972. Ford recalls switching instruments with Guaraldi, with "interesting" results.]

[Following these three February bookings, a sign appeared on the door at In Your Ear, indicating that the club's relationship with Guaraldi had been "severed." Shortly thereafter, a large fire -- deemed "mysterious" -- burned down the entire building.]

April 26-May 13

El Matador, San Francisco, with Vince Denham, sax and flute; Seward McCain, electric bass; and John Waller, drums.

July 5-14 (perhaps longer)

The New Twin Flames, Tucson, Arizona (sidemen unspecified).

July 7

Keystone Korner undergoes a total transformation under the guidance of new owner Todd Barkan, changing from a well-respected rock venue into one of San Francisco's last, great jazz clubs.

Summer

The Pierce Street Annex -- with Seward McCain, bass; Vince Denham, tenor sax; and Mike Clark, drums -- where Guaraldi "tries some electric stuff," according to Clark. Jerry Garcia is known to have joined the quartet on occasion, at which point the group was known as the Vince Guaraldi/Jerry Garcia Band.

Although McCain recalls these gigs taking place at the Matrix, that probably isn't correct, since that club had closed more than a year earlier. But McCain has the location correct, if not the name ... because shortly after the Matrix closed, its space was taken over by the nearby Pierce Street Annex, which remodeled the club and re-opened under its own name.

[Clark recalls doing "about six months' worth of these gigs," so it's possible they actually began a few months earlier, in the spring, and continued through late summer ... in which case the venue might still have been the Matrix, the first time or two. Alternatively, the gigs could have begun in the summer and continued through autumn; precious little is known about Guaraldi's bookings through most of 1972.]

July 23

The Robert Mondavi Winery Summer Music Festival, Oakville, California, as a trio (sidemen unspecified).

August 22

The Wally Heider Studio, San Francisco, scoring the TV special You're Not Elected, Charlie Brown. The sidemen are Tom Harrell, trumpet; Pat O'Hara, flute; Seward McCain, bass; and Glenn Cronkhite, drums.

September 13-17

The Boarding House, San Francisco, with Seward McCain, electric bass; and Glenn Cronkhite, drums.

Violinist Michael White opened each evening.

September 23-24

Paul Masson Vineyards, Saratoga, (sidemen unspecified), supporting jazz singer Jon Hendricks and Family.

October 7

The College of Marin, Kentfield (sidemen unspecified), for an afternoon benefit concert with Carlos Santana and Pete Escovedo.

UC Davis, California (sidemen unspecified), for an evening concert.

October 23

The Trident, Sausalito (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with the Cal Tjader Quintet, in a benefit for South Dakota Sen. George McGovern's bid to become U.S. President.

October 26

Lincoln Mercury Showroom, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), for the California Brandy Cabaret and Fashion Show.

The program also features the Leland Stanford Jr. University Marching Band and a flamenco dancer.

October 29

You're Not Elected, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV.

November 14-18

Great American Music Hall, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), subbing for an absent Shelly Manne, whose visit is postponed.

December 1

The Alhambra Theater, Sacramento (sidemen unspecified), opening for Van Morrison, during a benefit concert intended to help save the theater.

[The effort failed.]

December 15

Berkeley Community Theater (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with Van Morrison and Alice Stuart and Snake.

 

1973

January 8, 15, 22 and 29

The Village, San Francisco, as a trio (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with the Cleveland Wrecking Company jazz trio.

January 15 (daytime)

Wally Heider Studio, San Francisco, recording the score for the TV special There's No Time for Love, Charlie Brown. The combo features Tom Harrell, trumpet; Pat O'Hara, flute; Seward McCain, bass; and Glenn Cronkhite, drums.

January 17, 24 and 31

The Great American Music Hall, San Francisco, billed as the band Powder Keg: Guaraldi, Fender Rhodes (usually); Larry Vuckovich, piano; Tom Harrell, trumpet; Seward McCain, bass; and Glenn Cronkhite, drums.

January 19-20

Inn of the Beginning, Cotati, California (sidemen unspecified), joined by the Fairfax Street Choir.

February 2-3

The Lion's Share, San Anselmo (sidemen unspecified), billed as "Vince Guaraldi and One" ... an ambiguous newspaper entry that actually meant Guaraldi's combo was the featured act, with an opener by the group One.

[One -- or, actually, 1 -- was perhaps the psychedelic scene's most notorious band. The nine-piece "aural experience" was signed by RCA for an album that was released on Jefferson Airplane's vanity label, Grunt. 1 was fronted by a gentleman who, all involved swear, legally changed his named to -- I'm not making this up -- Reality D. Blipcrotch. The whole marvelous saga is recounted here by Airplane biographer Jeff Tamarkin. It makes great reading.]

February 5

The Lion's Share, San Anselmo, as a guest keyboardist with Van Morrison and his band.

February 7

The Great American Music Hall, San Francisco, billed as the band Powder Keg: Guaraldi, Fender Rhodes (usually); Larry Vuckovich, piano; Tom Harrell, trumpet; Seward McCain, bass; and Glenn Cronkhite, drums.

Carmen McRae headlines.

February 8

San Francisco, for a toast and roast of Lee Mendelson. Guaraldi performs solo alongside Josh Logan and two stars from the San Francisco production of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown.

February 9-10

Mandrake's, Berkeley (sidemen unspecified).

February 14, 21 and 28

The Great American Music Hall, San Francisco, billed as the band Powder Keg: Guaraldi, Fender Rhodes (usually); Larry Vuckovich, piano; Tom Harrell, trumpet; Seward McCain, bass; and Glenn Cronkhite, drums.

February 20-25

The Great American Music Hall, San Francisco, where Bill Evans is headlining for the week. According to George Winston, Guaraldi is in the audience "every night."

February 22 and 26

Wally Heider Studio, San Francisco, recording the score for the TV special There's No Time for Love, Charlie Brown. The combo features Tom Harrell, trumpet; Seward McCain, bass; and Glenn Cronkhite, drums.

March 7, 14 and 21

The Great American Music Hall, San Francisco, billed as the band Powder Keg: Guaraldi, Fender Rhodes (usually); Larry Vuckovich, piano; Tom Harrell, trumpet; Seward McCain, bass; and Glenn Cronkhite, drums.

March 11

There's No Time for Love, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV.

Late March

The Great American Music Hall, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), for performances "every Wednesday."

[This booking, however long it lasts, is in addition to the other Powder Keg appearances.]

April 27-28

Cal-Neva Lodge, North Lake Tahoe, Nevada (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with Van Morrison and Jackie De Shannon.

May 20

The Greek Theater, UC Berkeley (sidemen unspecified), for the United Farm Workers' third annual "Fiesta Campesina" celebration and fundraiser.

The program also includes Cal Tjader, Azteca and Luis Gasca.

May 22

San Francisco's KRON-TV Channel 4 studios, to help publicize the upcoming Oakland Symphony season. At one point, Guaraldi performs in a combo with John Handy, alto sax; Vernon Alley, bass; and Oakland Symphony conductor Harold Farberman, drums.

June 7

Union Square, San Francisco, judging the annual Cable Car Bell-Ringing Championship.

June 19

St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), for "The Mayor's Conference," sharing the bill with Elvin Bishop and Baroque Camerata.

June 19-July 7

El Matador, San Francisco, with Seward McCain, bass; and Mike Clark, drums.

Summer

Pierce Street Annex, San Francisco, with Seward McCain, bass; and Mike Clark, drums.

[Guaraldi's trio played "one or two nights a week for awhile," according to Clark.]

July 6

Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco, editing a finished version of the song "Joe Cool."

July 17-18

Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco, scoring A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving. The combo features Tom Harrell, trumpet; Chuck Bennett, trombone; Seward McCain, bass; and Mike Clark, drums.

August 6

Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco, scoring A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving. The combo features Tom Harrell, trumpet; Chuck Bennett, trombone; Seward McCain, bass; and Mike Clark, drums.

Mid-August

Basin Street West, another of San Francisco's iconic jazz clubs, closes.

August 16-19

El Matador, San Francisco, with Seward McCain, bass; and Jim Peluso, drums.

August 24

The Matrix rises from the dead, at a new location -- 412 Broadway -- that once housed Mr. D's.

September 16

Bach Dancing & Dynamite Society, Half Moon Bay, California (sidemen unspecified), as a quartet.

September 28 (and 29?)

The Matrix, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), sharing the bill with the Hayden Project.

October 1

Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco, working on the score for A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving. The combo includes Tom Harrell, trumpet; Chuck Bennett, trombone; Seward McCain, bass; and Mike Clark, drums.

October 8

Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco, recording songs for an unfinished album; the sidemen are Ron McClure, bass; and Mike Clark, drums.

Tracks recorded: "Autumn Leaves" and "Billie's Bounce."

November 13-18

The Lighthouse, Hermosa Beach (sidemen unspecified).

November 16

Booked at San Francisco State University, to share the bill with John Handy.

[This concert was canceled when superseded by Guaraldi's booking in Southern California, above.]

November 20

A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving debuts on CBS-TV.

Mid- to late December

The newly resurrected Matrix closes once again, for the final time, after barely four months.

December 28-January 5

El Matador, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified, although bassist Ron McClure remembers subbing one night).

December 29

The Huntington-Sheraton Hotel, Pasadena, for the 1973 Presidential Ball, sponsored by the Tournament of Roses and the Pasadena Chamber of Commerce. Guaraldi is one of many guests present, including Lee Mendelson and John Scott Trotter, to hear a presentation by Tournament Grand Marshall Charles M. Schulz.

[Larry Vuckovich subbed for Guaraldi at El Matador on this one evening.]

 

1974

Through January 5

El Matador, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

January 5

Wally Heider Studio, San Francisco, working on the score for It's a Mystery, Charlie Brown. The sidemen are Tom Harrell, trumpet; Seward McCain, bass; and Mike Clark, drums.

January 11

Wally Heider Studio, San Francisco, working on the score for It's the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown. The sidemen are Seward McCain, bass; and Eliot Zigmund, drums.

January 23 and 30

Wally Heider Studio, San Francisco, working on the score for It's a Mystery, Charlie Brown. The sidemen are Tom Harrell, trumpet; Seward McCain, bass; and Mike Clark, drums.

February 1

It's a Mystery, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV.

February 6

Wally Heider Studio, San Francisco, for a performance broadcast live over KPFA and KPFB. The sidemen are Seward McCain, bass, and Eliot Zigmund, drums.

This session is released decades later, on the CD The Vince Guaraldi Trio: Live on the Air.

February 12

Wally Heider Studio, San Francisco, working on the score for It's the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown. The sidemen are Seward McCain, bass; and Eliot Zigmund, drums.

February 16

The Sleeping Lady Cafe, Fairfax, California (sidemen unspecified).

February 20 and 26

Wally Heider Studio, San Francisco, working on the score for It's the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown. The sidemen are Seward McCain, bass; and Eliot Zigmund, drums.

March 14

Wally Heider Studio, San Francisco, working on the score for It's the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown. The sidemen are Seward McCain, bass; and Eliot Zigmund, drums.

March 23

The Showplace, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), for a benefit dinner dance for the Junior Alliance of Lincoln Child Center.

March 29-April 4

El Matador, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), as a last-minute replacement for jazz guitarist Gabor Szabo.

April 9

It's the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV.

April 28

TV appearance on Look Up and Live.

[There's no indication whether Guaraldi appeared solo, or with a trio.]

April 30-May 12

El Matador, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

June 8

The Sleeping Lady Cafe, Fairfax (sidemen unspecified).

June 13-July 14

Butterfield's, Menlo Park, California (sidemen unspecified).

[This supper club becomes Guaraldi's final "home away from home" for what remains of his career; he rotates in and out of bookings on a regular basis.]

July 16-20

El Matador, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

August 2

Veterans' Memorial Auditorium, San Mateo, as part of a performance by the astrological group The Sufi Choir, joined by Jimmy Witherspoon, Big Mama Thornton and Jon Hendricks.

August 6

The Sleeping Lady Cafe, Fairfax (sidemen unspecified).

August 17

The Winemasters' Guild Winery, Lodi, California (sidemen unspecified).

September 16

The Sleeping Lady Cafe, Fairfax (sidemen unspecified).

October 28

The Sleeping Lady Cafe, Fairfax (sidemen unspecified).

December 30

Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco, working on the score for Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown. The sidemen are Seward McCain, bass, and Vince Lateano, drums.

December 31

Butterfield's, Menlo Park (sidemen unspecified).

 

1975

January 3

Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco, working on the score for Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown. The sidemen are Seward McCain, bass, and Vince Lateano, drums.

January 28

Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV.

January 28-February 1

El Matador, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

April 11

The San Francisco Ballet Association auction preview, taking place at the St. Francis Yacht Club, includes among its biddable auction items "a concert by the Vince Guaraldi Trio."

[No indication of who won, or when this prize was enjoyed.]

April 12

College of Marin, Kentfield (sidemen unspecified).

April 18

de Saisset Art Gallery, University of Santa Clara (sidemen unspecified).

April 30-May 31

Butterfield's, Menlo Park (sidemen unspecified), beginning an ongoing gig Wednesdays through Saturdays.

[This booking includes a performance on May 13, for the restaurant's first-anniversary celebration.]

June 17, 24

Butterfield's, Menlo Park (sidemen unspecified), in a continuing series of Tuesday evening gigs.

June 23

Sweetwater, Mill Valley, California (sidemen unspecified).

July 1, 8, 15, 22

Butterfield's, Menlo Park (sidemen unspecified), in a continuing series of Tuesday evening gigs.

July 29-August 28

Butterfield's, Menlo Park (sidemen unspecified), now playing Tuesdays through Thursdays.

August 3

Sigmund Stern Recreation Grove, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), for the annual "Jazz in Stern Grove Music Festival."

The Bill includes Azteca, Rudy Salvini's Big Band and Jimmy Diamond's Nob Hill Gang.

August 23

Winemasters' Guild Winery, Lodi, with his trio (sidemen unspecified).

August 30

Santa Barbara, California -- Seward McCain, bass; and Mark Rosengarden, drums -- for the Autumn Jazz Festival.

The bill includes Louie Bellson, John Lewis and John Handy.

September 2-ongoing

Butterfield's, Menlo Park (sidemen unspecified), now playing Tuesdays, Wednesdays and occasional weekends.

September 6

Winemasters' Guild Winery, Lodi (sidemen unspecified).

September 12

Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco, working on the score for You're a Good Sport, Charlie Brown. The combo includes Seward McCain, electric bass; and Mark Rosengarden, drums.

September 18-20

El Matador, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified).

September 24

Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco, working on the score for You're a Good Sport, Charlie Brown. The combo includes Seward McCain, electric bass; and Mark Rosengarden, drums.

October 28

You're a Good Sport, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV.

November 20

Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), recording songs for an unproduced album.

Tracks recorded: "Joe Cool," "No. 1 Snoopy Place," "Special Song" and "Your Song."

December 8

The Orphanage, San Francisco (sidemen unspecified), as part of "Jon Hendricks and Friends."

The bill also includes Cal Tjader and John Handy.

December 9

Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco, recording tracks for an unproduced album.

The band features Tom Harrell, trumpet; Bill Atwood, trumpet and trombone; Seward McCain, electric bass and flute; and Mike Clark and Mark Rosengarden, drums.

 

1976

Unspecified

At some point during the year, The Trident closes, severing another link to Guaraldi's past.

Through February 6

Butterfield's, Menlo Park (sidemen unspecified), playing Tuesdays, Wednesdays and occasional weekends.

January

Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco, working on the score for It's Arbor Day, Charlie Brown. The combo includes Seward McCain, electric bass; and Jim Zimmerman, drums.

January 9

CBS-TV broadcasts Happy Anniversary, Charlie Brown, which includes a brief acknowledgment of Guaraldi (but no on-camera footage).

Late January/Early February

A booking "in the mountains," where Guaraldi and his sidemen -- Seward McCain, bass; and Jim Zimmerman, drums -- perform and enjoy winter skiing by day.

February 6

After completing studio recording work on It's Arbor Day, Charlie Brown in the afternoon, Guaraldi suffers a fatal heart attack between sets at Butterfield's -- performing with Seward McCain, bass; and Jim Zimmerman, drums -- while taking a break in the adjacent Red Cottage Inn. Guaraldi is 47 years old.

February 9

A private service takes place for Guaraldi at Our Lady of Mercy Church, Daly City; this is followed by a public service at the N. Gray & Co. Funeral Chapel, San Francisco. The burial takes place in Holy Cross Cemetery, Colma, California.

March 28

The Bach Dancing & Dynamite Society, Half Moon Bay, hosts the first "Tribute to Vince Guaraldi" concert by various Bay Area musicians. This year's gathering includes Larry Vuckovich, Benny Barth and George DeQuattro.

[This event turns into an annual tradition, generally held on or near each Easter, at least through 1981.]

April 16

The big-screen feature film A Boy Named Charlie Brown makes its network television debut.

May 17

During the annual broadcast of television's Emmy Awards, Lee Mendelson takes the stage to discuss how Guaraldi changed the musical landscape of animated TV specials.

May 22

Grace Cathedral, San Francisco: Cal Tjader's quintet -- Lonnie Hewitt, electric piano; Robb Fisher, acoustic bass; Pete Riso, drums; and Poncho Sanchez, congas -- steps in to fill the booking that Guaraldi's death prevented him from making. Tjader honors Guaraldi during this performance, dedicating two songs to him.

June 27

Sigmund Stern Recreation Grove, San Francisco: A tribute concert to Guaraldi is delivered by Cal Tjader's Quintet (Frank Mecurio, piano; Robb Fisher, bass; Pete Riso, drums; and Poncho Sanchez, congas).

The program also includes the Turk Murphy Band and Rudy Salvini's 18-piece big band.

 

1977

Spring

San Francisco's El Matador closes, severing another link to Guaraldi's past.

April 3

The Bach Dancing & Dynamite Society, Half Moon Bay, hosts the second "Tribute to Vince Guaraldi" concert by various Bay Area musicians. This year's gathering includes Larry Vuckovich, Eddie Duran, Dean Reilly, Benny Barth, George DeQuattro, John Rae, Seward McCain and Vince Lateano.

October 27

It's Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV. Although the score is composed by Ed Bogas and Judy Munsen, Guaraldi receives credit for "Linus and Lucy."

 

1978

February 23

What a Nightmare, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV. The score is once again composed by Ed Bogas and Judy Munsen; Guaraldi receives credit for "Linus and Lucy."

April 2

The Bach Dancing & Dynamite Society, Half Moon Bay, hosts the third "Tribute to Vince Guaraldi" concert by various Bay Area musicians. This year's gathering includes Don Haas, Eddie Duran, Dean Reilly, Benny Barth, Larry Vuckovich, George DeQuattro, John Rae, Seward McCain, Vince Lateano and Bob Lucas.

 

1979

January 5

Happy Birthday, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV. This anniversary show includes a nice tribute to Guaraldi by Charles M. Schulz.

March 19

You're the Greatest, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV. The score is once again composed by Ed Bogas and Judy Munsen, who receive sole credit. Guaraldi isn't mentioned, nor is "Linus and Lucy" used.

[None of the next 13 prime-time Peanuts specials would mention Guaraldi, or use any of his music.]

April 15

The Bach Dancing & Dynamite Society, Half Moon Bay, hosts the fourth "Tribute to Vince Guaraldi" concert by various Bay Area musicians. This year's gathering includes Cal Tjader, Eddie Duran, Dean Reilly, Benny Barth, John Rae, Larry Vuckovich, Seward McCain, Vince Lateano, George DeQuattro and Lee Katzman.

 

1980

Late Winter/Early Spring

Fantasy records releases the album Vince Guaraldi's Greatest Hits.

April 6

The Bach Dancing & Dynamite Society, Half Moon Bay, hosts the fifth "Tribute to Vince Guaraldi" concert by various Bay Area musicians. This year's gathering includes Larry Vuckovich, Eddie Duran, Dean Reilly, Benny Barth, George DeQuattro, John Rae, Seward McCain, Vince Lateano and Bob Lucas.

December 25 (roughly)

The Trident, Guaraldi's performance home away from home in the early 1960s, goes under for the third and final time.

 

1981

April 19

The Bach Dancing & Dynamite Society, Half Moon Bay, hosts the sixth "Tribute to Vince Guaraldi" concert by various Bay Area musicians. This year's gathering includes Larry Vuckovich, Eddie Duran, Dean Reilly, Benny Barth, George DeQuattro, John Rae, Seward McCain, Vince Lateano and Bob Lucas.

July

Keyboard Magazine publishes an extensive seven-page feature article about Guaraldi and his career, written by Bob Doerschuk.

[This proves to be the only article of substance about Guaraldi, for nearly two decades.]

 

1982

June 15

Jazz guitarist Ron Eschete covers "Christmas Time Is Here" on his holiday album, Christmas Impressions.

[This is believed to be the first jazz cover of this Guaraldi song.]

 

1983

July 11

Keystone Korner owner Todd Barkan reluctantly closes his club's doors for the final time, concluding the impressive 11-year run of San Francisco's last, lingering "classic" jazz venue.

 

1985

Jazz pianist David Benoit's seventh album, This Side Up, includes a "funky" cover of Guaraldi's "Linus and Lucy." The song becomes a hit, particularly on New York's WPIX 101.9 FM.

 

1986

Fantasy Records begins to re-issue Guaraldi's albums on CD, starting with A Charlie Brown Christmas.

 

1988

October 21

"The Mayflower Voyagers," the first installment of the eight-part Peanuts miniseries, This Is America, Charlie Brown, debuts on CBS-TV. Each episode is scored by a different musician -- including David Benoit, George Winston, Dave Brubeck, Dave Grusin, Wynton Marsalis and Ellis Marsalis -- many of whom cover "Linus and Lucy" and other Guaraldi themes.

 

1989

September 25

GRP Records releases the compilation album Happy Anniversary, Charlie Brown, which features an all-Guaraldi package performed by music luminaries such as David Benoit, Chick Corea, Gerry Mulligan, Kenny G, B.B. King, Joe Williams and Patti Austin.

 

1991

October 8

MusicMasters Records releases Dave Brubeck's album, Quiet as the Moon, which features the music he performed in This Is America, Charlie Brown. "Linus and Lucy" and "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" are covered.

 

1992

November 27

It's Christmastime Again, Charlie Brown debuts on CBS-TV. David Benoit takes over the Peanuts scoring franchise with this special, and includes fresh covers of numerous Guaraldi compositions.

 

1994

January 18

You're in the Superbowl, Charlie Brown debuts on NBC-TV. David Benoit once again scores the show, and includes fresh covers of numerous Guaraldi compositions.

 

1995

April 18

Columbia Records releases the Wynton Marsalis/Ellis Marsalis album Joe Cool's Blues, which features their original music for This Is America, Charlie Brown, along with covers of numerous Guaraldi compositions.

 

1996

September 17

Windham Hill Records releases solo pianist George Winston's Linus & Lucy: The Music of Vince Guaraldi.

 

1997

February

Fantasy Records' A Charlie Brown Christmas goes platinum, with sales of more than 1 million copies.

August 5

It Was My Best Birthday Ever, Charlie Brown is released directly to home video. David Benoit once again scores the show, and includes fresh covers of numerous Guaraldi compositions.

December

Starbucks "brands" Guaraldi's A Charlie Brown Christmas album and sells the CD in coffee shops across the country.

 

1998

September 8

Fantasy Records releases Charlie Brown's Holiday Hits, a collection of (mostly) previously unreleased Guaraldi Peanuts cues.

November 28

George Winston presents an all-Guaraldi concert at the Luther Burbank Center in Santa Rosa, California. Audience members include Charles and Jeannie Schulz; Guaraldi's mother, Carmella; and his son, David, and his family.

 

2000

September 19

Jazz pianist Cyrus Chestnut releases his own version of A Charlie Brown Christmas: a cover of Guaraldi's entire album.

December

Hallmark "brands" Guaraldi's A Charlie Brown Christmas album and sells the CD in gift and stationery stores across the country.

 

2001

June 7

Slightly more than a year after Charles M. Schulz's death, he is posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, one of the United States' highest civilian honors. As the Marine Corps Band enters the Capitol Rotunda, where the ceremony takes place, the musicians play "Linus and Lucy."

 

2003

August 19

Bluebird/BMG releases the album The Charlie Brown Suite, which finally allows fans to hear this longer work Guaraldi and his band performed back in May of 1969; the CD also includes a few other Guaraldi selections.

 

2004

October 19

Vince Guaraldi's son, David, dips into tape archives and -- working with various labels and producers, over the years -- begins to issue much of his father's unreleased work. The first album, Oaxaca, will be followed by many others. In a nice nod toward history, the CD is issued on Vince Guaraldi's revived D&D label.

December 1

Fantasy Records merges with Concord Records, losing its own identity to become part of the Concord Music Group.

 

2005

August 2

David Guaraldi co-produces and releases the first CD re-issue of his father's extremely scarce album, Vince Guaraldi with the San Francisco Boys Chorus. It, too, is released on the revived D&D label, as will be the case with future CDs.

October 4

Concord/Peak Records releases 40 Years: A Charlie Brown Christmas, an anthology album with covers of Guaraldi's original TV special music by artists including David Benoit, Dave Koz, Vanessa Williams and The Rippingtons.

December

After having remained unseen for four decades, Lee Mendelson's first Peanuts documentary, 1964's A Boy Named Charlie Brown -- the film in which Guaraldi actually debuted "Linus and Lucy" and other iconic Peanuts songs -- is released on DVD by the Charles M. Schulz Museum.

December 17

The Charles M. Schulz Museum, in Santa Rosa, California, hosts an event to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the debut broadcast of A Charlie Brown Christmas. Featured guests include Lee Mendelson, Vince Guaraldi's son David, former child actor Peter Robbins (the original voice of Charlie Brown) and 10 former members of the St. Paul Episcopal Church Choir, who were children when they recorded the songs in that television special.

 

2006

January 19

David Guaraldi once again dips into tape archives and releases North Beach, an album of his father's music -- live and studio -- previously unavailable in any form.

October 10

Concord Music releases a re-mastered version of Guaraldi's A Charlie Brown Christmas, complete with numerous bonus tracks.

December

The U.S. Postal Service "brands" Guaraldi's A Charlie Brown Christmas album and sells the CD in Post Offices across the country.

 

2007

January 1

David Guaraldi releases The Lost Cues from the Charlie Brown Television Specials, a collection of previously unheard tracks that Vince Guaraldi recorded for various Peanuts TV specials.

 

2008

January 12

Guaraldi's A Charlie Brown Christmas album finally hits No. 1 on Billboard's Top Pop Catalogue Albums list, for the first time in its 42-year existence.

[It also remains on Billboard's Top 200 best-selling album list at all times, and generally places -- each year -- within the Top 25 of Billboard's best-selling holiday albums.]

February 6

David Guaraldi releases The Lost Cues from the Charlie Brown Television Specials, Volume 2, a second collection of previously unheard tracks that Vince Guaraldi recorded for various Peanuts TV specials.

November 4

Toby Gleason and Andrew Thomas begin work on what will become their full-length documentary film: The Anatomy of Vince Guaraldi.

November 14

David Guaraldi releases The Vince Guaraldi Trio: Live on the Air, the debut appearance of a 60-minute concert given February 6, 1974, and broadcast live over San Francisco's KPFA and KPFB.

 

2009

June 30

Concord Music releases the album Vince Guaraldi: Essential Standards.

September 19

Toby Gleason and Andrew Thomas preview The Anatomy of Vince Guaraldi as a work-in-progress at the annual Monterey Jazz Festival.

October 6

Concord Music releases the two-CD album The Definitive Vince Guaraldi.

Late Autumn/Early Winter

Guaraldi's original score for A Charlie Brown Christmas hits sales of 2 million.

 

2010

February 2

George Winston releases Love Will Come: The Music of Vince Guaraldi, Volume 2, his second collection of solo piano Guaraldi covers.

April 19

Toby Gleason and Andrew Thomas begin screening The Anatomy of Vince Guaraldi at film festivals across the United States, starting with the eighth annual Redwood Coast Whale and Jazz Festival, in Point Arena, California.

April 20

Concord Music releases the album Peanuts Portraits, which contains previously unissued Peanuts tracks by Guaraldi.

August

The building that once housed Butterfield's, in Menlo Park, finally is torn down. Its final tenant -- an Indian restaurant -- had been out of business for some time.

[The adjacent Red Cottage Inn, on the other hand, remains a going concern.]

September 28

Concord Music releases a re-mastered version of Guaraldi's Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus, complete with numerous bonus tracks.

December

Starbucks "brands" Guaraldi's A Charlie Brown Christmas album a second time, and once again sells the CD in coffee shops across the country.

 

2011

Winter

Guaraldi's original score for A Charlie Brown Christmas hits sales of 3 million.

November 24

David Guaraldi releases An Afternoon with the Vince Guaraldi Quartet, the debut appearance of recordings made during several of the performances given by the combo in October of 1967, at the Old Town Theatre in Los Gatos, California.

 

2012

May 23

Guaraldi's original score for A Charlie Brown Christmas is one of 25 recordings inducted this year into the U.S. Library of Congress' National Recording Registry: an impressive honor guaranteeing that the album really will live forever.

August 7

Concord Music releases The Very Best of Vince Guaraldi, a 14-song collection that gathers more of his best work from the Fantasy years: the late 1950s through the mid-60s.

 



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